Blogger Emily Mroczek-Bayci

Best Books of the Year: Gotta Recommend Them All

The end of the year is when all the various “best of,” lists come out and as a librarian it is overwhelming to keep up with everything. I find that my holds list gets obnoxiously long as I frantically try to read ALL THE BOOKS I missed. I like looking at various library’s “best of” lists like Chicago Public Library’s “Kids Best of the Best Books,”https://www.chipublib.org/kids-best-of-the-best/ or Evanston Public Library’s 101 Great Books for Kids I prefer to refer my family, friends and patrons to library or review journal recommended lists (like School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2021) I find these can be helpful to introduce new titles for people who might revert to their childhood favorites or another series title. I also love to see what wins Mock competitions at various libraries. Another fun favorite to look at is Betsy Bird’s 31 Days of Lists where she features…

Blogger Emily Mroczek-Bayci

A deep dive into: Picture Book Categories

How many times has a patron asked you for books about princesses, or Pete the Cat, or colors and you’ve had to ask them for specific titles or to wait a few minutes to consult your computer? The traditional method of organizing books by an authors last name does not allow for brows-ability, especially in a picture book section. That is why many libraries find ways to feature their picture books with face out shelving and to reorganize the picture books into categories or topics. I took a look at local libraries around me and on the Internet to see various trends and ideas for organizing picture books. It seemed like common trends with libraries who employed categories were customer satisfaction, easier brows-ability and increased circulation. Naming it My old library called our organized picture books, “Kids Favorites,” and divided certain books into specific categories while keeping some books in…

Blogger Emily Mroczek-Bayci

Advanced Readers Advisory: Comfort Youth Librarianship

During uncertain times that never stop being uncertain, I find myself wanting to curl up in the “comfort portions” of children’s librarianship. One of the aspects of my job that has not been altered drastically by COVID-19 is readers advisory and my speciality: advanced readers advisory. The kids are still reading, reading and reading. The kids are still coming in thinking they have read every book in the library and it is still my job to stump them. Here are “five of my back-pocket tricks” to win readers advisory.