Blogger Building Partnerships committee

See to Read

Public librarians commonly think that helping children get ready for kindergarten is early literacy skills, learning numbers, being able to follow simple instructions, learning to be part of a group. Oregon libraries also help parents meet a kindergarten registration requirement—vision screening. Why vision screening for preschoolers? See to Read, a partnership between the Oregon Library Association and the Elks Children’s Eye Clinic at Oregon Health and Science University, is guided by the belief that no child should begin learning to read and write with an undetected vision problem. According to the Elks Children’s Eye Clinic, 80% of learning in the first years comes through vision and often children are misdiagnosed with behavioral or developmental issues. See to Read aims to detect vision problems that can only be treated successfully if caught before age 7. How it works Library staff schedules a screening at no cost to the library, thanks to…

Early Literacy

BIG Play = BIG Fun!

A firefighter, a chef, a magician, and two elephants are creating an elaborate, imaginary world in the dress-up tent. Engineers are building cardboard forts and testing the strength of their structures. An acrobat is crawling and peeking through a small tunnel. Three printmakers are working on a collaborative piece of rubber stamp art. And a pair of tiny zoo keepers are inspecting, touching, squeezing, (and maybe even chewing on) a variety of soft, stuffed animals. Where are all these little ones doing all these things all in one place? They are at their library’s Big Play Date, and they are loving it! Inspired by Brooklyn Public Library’s innovative idea, libraries all over the country are hosting Big Play Dates and growing community, providing big fun, supporting parental learning, and strengthening the brains of our youngest patrons in the process. Here at San Francisco Public Library (SFPL), we host what we…

Blogger Katie Salo

Tips for a Successful Music & Movement Program

2016 marks my third year of running the incredibly popular Music & Movement program “Shake, Shimmy, & Dance” during summer reading. This crowd-pleasing, high-energy program packs in 70-120 multi-generational participants each week. I’ve thought a lot this past week about what has made the program so successful and about some tips to pass on to other youth librarians looking to replicate this program. Top Ten Tips for a Successful Music & Movement Program Know your music collection. If you’ve got a particular artist that your community knows and loves, pop them into your playlist. For my kiddos, it’s Jim Gill and Laurie Berkner. If they hear the beginning of The Goldfish Song anywhere, they squeal with joy. Empower your grown-ups to get involved. Don’t let them sit down on the sideline and help lead them by providing instructions or dance tips. I include a ton of dance tips on the…

Blogger Sarah Bean Thompson

Fandom Jr. Update

Back in April, I wrote about how we are shaking up our Summer Storytime schedule and adding in a new program called Fandom Jr. The idea is to offer a drop in program on Friday mornings based on popular preschool topics and themes. I promised an update! I hosted my first Fandom Jr. last week and it was a huge success! For our first program, I wanted to focus on community heroes, so we chose the popular Nick Jr. show, Paw Patrol. The program combined a little bit of a playtime, a little bit of a storytime, and lots of fun. I had lots of various activities and stations set up around the room including: Pin the badge on the pup (made by one of my amazing staff using materials from the Nick Jr website) Community Helper dolls (from our circulating toy collection-we have three sets of  community helper action figures and…