Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Can Babies Benefit from Virtual Storytime?

The virtual storytimes I have been holding for toddlers and preschoolers have been more successful than I had hoped…or feared.  Children have been much more engaged and responsive via Zoom than I believed they would.  They dance along to the songs.  They join in on fingerplays.  And they have a lot to say at the end of storytime when we say “hello” to each participant.  However, the question remained…what to do with babies?  I’ve been experimenting and would like to share some thoughts.

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Pandemic Picture Book Picks

Prince Harry has written the foreword to Hospital on the Hill, an upcoming book by author Chris Connaughton.  The book reportedly tells the story of a young person whose parent worked—and died—on the frontlines of a hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The royal’s introduction discusses the loss of his mother, Princess Diana, when he was 12 years old. 

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Zooming into STEAM Programming

I love book clubs. I personally belong to four (three of which focus on children’s and teen titles).  I run one for tweens at my library.  The adjustment of doing this all online was very simple. I love storytimes.  After figuring out how best to frame staff on the Zoom screen and getting storytime permissions, storytimes adjusted virtually very easily. I love STEAM programs. …….. Seriously, though, I was wondering HOW exactly STEAM programs were going to translate to a live virtual program.  I had done, and seen, some pre-taped crafts and such, but I’ve been just itching to actually connect and interact with kids.  I know many, many of my colleagues have been offering deeply impactful STEAM programs online, but last week was my first. I don’t really get nervous programming anymore.  I was nervous for this. I chose a program on Air and Wind that I was supposed…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Jolly Holidays All Year Round

After battling the elements to get to the branch (snow, snow, and more snow), I spent several days last week changing my seasonal displays. I am lucky to work (and live) in a truly diverse community that has for a long time featured large Catholic and Jewish populations and now boasts a growing African American community along with immigrant groups from Turkey and southern India.  I’m always excited to feature diverse books, and offering mirrors and windows to a diversifying neighborhood always seems very worthwhile. Nothing makes this clearer than my holiday displays.  I recently dismantled my Lunar New Year, Valentine’s Day, and Presidents’ Day books, plumped up my Black History Display, and looked ahead to upcoming holidays…and what a plethora are approaching!  Not to forget: February 26th: Purim March 14th: Pi Day March 17th: St. Patrick’s Day March 20th: Norwuz March 27th: First day of Passover March 28th: Holi…

Blogger Managing Children's Services Committee

When You’re Not the Supervisor…But You Have to Manage Staff

While working on another project, I came across the book Middle Management in Academic and Public Libraries, edited by Tom Diamond.  One chapter caught my eye: “Managing the Performance of People Who Do Not Report to You.” This situation happens fairly frequently, and it can be a difficult one to navigate. Some examples I have experienced: My system has a Homework Center.  While I am the direct supervisor of my branch’s Homework Center Coordinator, the Center’s tutors report to someone at our Administrative Building.  There are several layers of messy supervision…the Coordinator is the person who directly sees the tutors at work.  I, as the children’s librarian, visit often but am not in the room the entire time.  And the actual supervisor may only see the tutor a few times a semester. I often have to guide the coordinator in addressing tutor issues, as this position was frequently a first…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Serving Social-Emotional Needs—Middle Grade Edition

For the past three years, my library system (Cuyhaoga County Public Library in suburban Cleveland, Ohio, aka CCPL) has reached out to school librarians, ELA staff, and school administrators through School Librarian Book Buzz.  This event informs school staff of the services and materials CCPL has to offer, such as educator cards, databases, and more.  In addition, library staff give book talks on topics pertinent to teachers—STEAM titles, diverse titles, and, this year, books that serve social-emotional needs. I was honored to be chosen to discuss social-emotional books during this year’s online conference.  Last month, I shared titles for students in grades K-2.  This month, we’ll discuss middle grade books.  Onto my four picks for middle-grade students! Baloney and Friends Greg Pizzoli, author Publisher: Disney-Hyperion ISBN: 9781368054546 That third grader who would really benefit from a social-emotional book but just hates to read might be convinced to give this book…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Serving Social-Emotional Needs

For the past three years, my library system (Cuyhaoga County Public Library in suburban Cleveland, Ohio, aka CCPL) has reached out to school librarians, ELA staff, and school administrators through School Librarian Book Buzz.  This event informs school staff of the services and materials CCPL has to offer, such as educator cards, databases, and more.  In addition, library staff give book talks on topics pertinent to teachers—STEAM titles, diverse titles, and, this year, books that serve social-emotional needs. I was honored to be chosen to discuss social-emotional books during this year’s online conference.  This month, I’ll share titles for students in grades K-2.  Next month, we’ll discuss middle grade books.  Onto my four picks for young students! Author Grace Byers believes that all children can achieve their goals.  Featuring diversity of race, religion, and ability, I Believe I Can is short enough to read aloud to a group of young…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Vote for Books!

Or rather, books about voting. How can we engage our young customers in the electoral process, and start imparting the importance of voting upon them at a young age? This would be the time to do a mock election at your branch—Peanut Butter or Jelly?  Chocolate or vanilla?  I recall seeing this great blog that had a secret voting booth and everything!  But this year, however…EVERYTHING is different, again thanks to the pandemic.  One thing that remains, though, is that publishers put out election-friendly books for kids during our presidential election year.  And today, I’m going to take a look at a few of them. First, for the picture book set: Jonathan London’s Froggy for President. Froggy is so excited to run for class president that he leaves his house in only his underwear and is once again saved by his reliable mom.  Of course, Frogilina would run against him,…