Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Developing Executive Function @ the Library

Ever since Every Child Ready to Read focused children’s librarianship on scientific research and empowered librarians to see themselves as experts who can speak to parents, our field has increasingly looked to brain development to support our practices and inform what we do.  Early literacy, however, is not the only growth going on in the brains of our early childhood customers.  Executive Functioning skills start to develop at around 7-8 months and peak between ages 3-5.  Can librarians help with this development as well?

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Back to School Outreach

Summer reading is coming to an end, and school is starting up soon. In fact, where I live, some schools start next week!  As we transition into fall, the start of a new semester gives librarians ample opportunities to reach out beyond our typical users and let non or infrequent users know about our programs and services.  Here are some tips that have worked for me over the years.

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Serving the Whole Child

I recently had the opportunity to attend a discussion at the City Club of Cleveland pertaining to the Whole Child Framework adopted by the Ohio Department of Education.  Meryl Johnson, a member of the Ohio State Board of Education, Dr. Tracy Nájera, executive director of the Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio, and Joseph Spiccia, superintendent of the Wickliffe City School District were members of a panel discussion moderated by Dr. Lisa Damour, author, psychologist, and Senior Advisor to the Schubert Center for Child Studies, Case Western Reserve University.

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Resources for Families

Since re-opening to the public, the libraries in my system have encountered more and more families in need of referrals to other agencies for food, other essentials, support for special needs, parenting, etc.  We are especially finding this in our Kindergarten Readiness programming.  More than half of these children’s lives have been lived since the pandemic began, and, understandably, parents have been at times reluctant to have their children involved in activities outside of the home, even regarding assistance for special needs.  I am hopeful this trend will change now with the ability to vaccinate at 6 months. However, we will still see several cohorts of children affected by this isolation.  Some of these needs the library can address directly.  We work with our local foodbank to offer summer lunch programs at our eligible branches.  All branches have granola bars available to feed hungry kids on demand.  Several branches offer…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Bringing Back Play

This past month, my library system has allowed certain toys (plastic, easily washed) to come back on the floor and to be used in programming, with daily (or more) cleaning. Parents and children alike are delighted, and library staff rejoiced that our baby playtimes can return.  Several branches are designated Family Place Libraries, and we had been holding socially distanced “play” programs that aimed to give parents tools to guide their children in play, but which were certainly not as robust and developmentally appropriate as a full playtime.

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Ready to Recommend: Brushing Up on Readers’ Advisory

As summer approaches, it’s time to ramp up our readers’ advisory skills for the onslaught of summer reading.  (Hopefully) Coming out of the pandemic, avoiding the summer slide will be more important than ever, and more kids may be struggling with reading thanks to disrupted schooling.  How do we make sure we get the right books into the hands of students?