Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

Programming Be “Tween” the Lines #alsc18 #act4kids

I LOVE programs where I come out of the session with program plans that can be easily adapted for my library.  This program had plenty of great ideas, from fuzzy moon sand to boo bubbles.  My favorite program was the Barbie bungee.  A couple of us were given a pile of rubber bands to make an interlocking bungee for Barbie.  Our goal was for Barbie to bungee jump and for only her hair to touch the floor.  You didn’t want her to crash, but you wanted the hair to reach the floor.  We estimated how many rubber bands that we would need and tested it out.  Sadly, our Barbie crashed as we used 3 too many rubber bands. This program can be easily recreated.  Supplies you will need include: -some sort of doll (multiple that are exactly the same).  You can use superheroes, Barbies, or whatever would be fun for…

Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

The View From Up Top #alsc2018

I am now done presenting and I feel that I can now breathe and finish off the Institute in style. Thanks to everyone who attended my session and especially those who reached out afterwards (or in elevators and breakfast lines) to tell me nice things. I hope I spread some new ideas that were practical enough that I will see them pop up in libraries across the country. #act4kids There is just one day left and my notebook is filled with notes like: Anji Play! Scientist led STEAM walk Do NOT ‘other’ diverse books Treat poetry like ice cream, not broccoli Saturday Morning Cartooning Purchasing instruments for families to keep #narrativeplenitude I think my biggest takeaways at any conference or workshop are ones that come from these simple phrases I hear and jot down. Sessions don’t always relate exactly to what you are doing in your library, but it is…

Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

First program worth the sprint down the street! #alsc18

After a crazy morning of travel, I arrived at #alsc18 just in time for the first program–Identity in Children’s Literature. I’m so glad I made it for this one! Authors T.R. Simon and Kelly Yang and author/illustrator Mike Curato were each paired with a children’s librarian for this program. Each artist spoke about their book and then the librarian spoke about a program based around the book. What a great idea! I came away with interesting information about each of the books, along with some new ideas for programming. I was especially intrigued by Librarian Natasha Forrester Campbell’s idea for a game based on Yang’s Front Desk. Now I just have to figure out when to try that one! So many interesting ideas in this program. So inspiring. So worth sprinting down the street to make it there in time!   This post addresses the following ALSC Core Competency: VII….

Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

The Day I Made a Room of Librarians Dance at #alsc18

I have always loved presenting. I did forensics in high school and was a theatre kid all my life. Standing in front of a crowd of like minded souls (#act4kids) is thrilling, inspiring, and a little intimidating. My journey to presenting at the 2018 ALSC Institute began about a year ago. Today, it was announced that ALSC 2020 will be in Minneapolis. I highly encourage anyone with the inkling of an idea to start thinking about program proposals. It is so worth it. Last September, I submitted a proposal. You basically fill out a long form to flesh out what your program will be about. You write a description and outline, include your bio, and provide some learning objectives for the possible attendees of your program. The committee reviews all proposals and, if selected, you receive a lovely email to confirm your commitment. I jumped for joy, told my friends,…

Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

Grown-ups Are People Too. #alsc18 #act4kids

Do you work with small children and their caregivers?  Then this presentation is for you!  Julie Crabb from Anythink Libraries showed off her tricks to engaging caregivers and making them WANT to attend your programs. Step 1: Make slight adjustments to what you are currently doing.  Can you add in a pop song or one that caregivers will recognize?  An excellent suggestion from the audience was that just about every nursery rhyme can be set to the song We Will Rock You.  The Jbrary YouTube channel has a great example of All the Little Babies set to the tune of All the Single Ladies.  You may ask why to do something like this.  Grown-ups will leave your program with ear worms, which will lead to more grown-ups singing in their homes. Step 2-Research your city and events.  What’s hot for parents?  Does your community offer a coffee story time?  How…