Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

Final Call for Caldecott Suggestions

Final call for your suggestions for the 2019 Caldecott Award! ALSC members are invited to submit book titles from the 2018 publishing year by December 15 for consideration. The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American picture book for children published in the United States in English during the preceding year. For the complete terms and criteria, refer to the ALSC website. Have your ALA login & password handy to access the suggestion forms, and go here to post your suggestion(s)! With thanks, Mary Fellows 2019 Caldecott Committee Chair   This post addresses the following ALSC Core Competency: IV. Knowledge, Curation, and Management of Materials.

Blogger Sarah Bean Thompson

Bedtime Books for the Weary

Photo Credit: Tired by Andrew Bardwell (photo of baby yawning) You know the look-the tired eyes, the coffee cup in hand, the weary smile. It’s the look of a caregiver who has been trying, unsuccessfully, to get some sleep. Maybe the child is a newborn or maybe they’re a negotiating preschooler, but it’s a common thread among adults-the cry of why won’t you sleep? The theme of kids not sleeping has long been a picture book go to, but the theme has gotten especially creative this year with books published for the adults as much as their kids. These new picture books are sure to get laughs and nods from the adults in storytime as they see themselves and their kids in the pages.

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Celebrating Pura Belpré’s Birthday!

Celebrating Pura Belpré’s Birthday! February 2nd is Pura Belpré’s birthday – for those of you playing along at home, she’d have 119 candles on the cake!  Continuing my unofficial, non-sequential series of how to incorporate multicultural offerings in every program, we’re going to see how we can make Pura’s award winners come to life!  But first… Who was Pura Belpré? For those of you just joining us, Pura Belpré was born in Cidra, Puerto Rico.  By serendipitous circumstances, she ended up in New York City for her sister’s wedding and was hired by a public library.  Huge emphasis on this, folks: it was 1920 and they were looking to hire young women from ethnically diverse backgrounds!  Imagine that!  Almost 100 years ago! Her career took her from the Bronx to the Lower East Side, where she spread the love of stories in English and Spanish – which had never been done before.  As…

Blogger Angela Reynolds

Taking picture books to teachers

Over the past few months, I’ve been part of a Professional Development day for teachers throughout our local school board. They spend the day working on using picture books for reading and writing lessons, and then I come in for an hour and show them how to look at picture books as art objects. My experience on the Caldecott committee really comes in useful here– I have been sharing the books from our 2015 list, because I know those so well. I’ve been able to find something new in the books, to find a different way of looking at the books. That’s what surprises me most– to find a new way to look at picture books. I have spent so many years as a librarian looking at the art and storytime potential. Now I also look at the teaching potential.  For instance: I just learned about “thought tracking”. Basically, it…