Books

Oranges and Elefantes: ECRR2 en Espanol #alsc14

A highlight of yesterday was a group singalong of “Los Elefantes,” a tune that’s perfect for Spanish and bilingual storytimes. Abigail Morales was showing “Every Child Ready to Read en Espanol” attendees how to enrich “Los Elefantes” by clothespinning paper elephants to a string to visually reinforce the counting component of the song. Abigail, Ana Elloa Pavon, and Saroj Ghoting provided many tips on how to implement ECRR into libraries serving Spanish-speaking communities. A handy kit helps librarians share reading, writing, playing, writing, and singing literacy tips and is available through the ALA Store. Not sure if the kit meets your needs? Abigail shared how the San Diego Library personalized the kit, making it more culturally relevant to the families her staff serves. In addition to “Los Elefantes,” she demonstrated a cool interactive multi-sensory activity using oranges. Ana shared a detailed bibliography of Spanish and bilingual books that can serve as a…

Live Blogging

ECRR2 at #pla2014 preconference

Sure, you can use your five fingers to remind yourself about ECRR2 but it’s going to be a snowy PLA, so if your mittens are hiding those fingers, just remember to TALK!  The preconference sessions panel gave us a mini-session on presenting ECRR2 and then moved on to their successes (and roadblocks) to bringing it to their communities.  I’m always on the hunt for new tips to share with parents, so here’s a few I’m taking with me: *Every time you read a wordless book with your child, it’s a different experience.  Tired of reading the same books over and over? Wordless books can be a sanity saver! *Children learn 9 new words each day *Lullabies get a lot of mileage in a child’s life.  The song that is part of a bedtime routine for a toddler helps calm a sick 4 year old or ease an anxious 8 year…

Blogger Amanda Roberson

You’ve Got Mail @ Your Library!

Lexington Park Library’s newest active learning center is a Post Office complete with envelopes, paper, pencils (yes, pencils!), Mail Carrier costume, and mail boxes.   We selected eight book characters to have mail boxes at our library and made up addresses for them.  For example, Next, we made three plastic envelopes for each character with their address and picture on it. Then, we bought mailboxes from Lowes and labeled them each with a book characters address and picture. A volunteer mounted them on small stands that he made. They are placed around the Children’s section for kids to find as they deliver the mail. We set up a table in the corner of the Children’s section of the library to be our Post Office. It has the Mail Carrier Costume, a place to sort mail, a big blue mail box, a letter chart and is stocked with lined paper and…