Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Libraries Rock: Between Summer READing ‘n’ Hard Places

Summer READing is upon us! So, you’ve got everything lined up for summer.  Performers – check!  Special storytimes – check!  Crafts – check!  Libraries rock! But what about the unexpected?  It’s all happened to us – a performer cancels at the last minute, or a crucial staff member calls in sick.  Will you be ready? Here’s some quick and easy hands-on activities that can be turned into full-blown, hour long programs!  All on the turn of a dime and just as affordable!  Rock – I mean – read on! Libraries Rock – Literally! Zen or Sharpie Stones What could be easier?  Take some rocks, get some Sharpies and create simply patterns all over them! These can be as simple or as complex as you want: Mini Rock Garden Easy mode: Get a shoe box lid, add some sand and rocks and create patterns with a plastic fork. Source: Pinterest Tip: Put…

Blogger School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Knitting Club for Tweens – a step-by-step how-to guide

Hand knitting has been around for arguably thousands of years, though in modern times its popularity has waxed and waned.  Waldorf schools around the world have long recognized that teaching young children handicrafts helps develop their fine motor and analytical skills. The great thing is, libraries can promote knitting, too! Currently, knitting is very popular and many libraries have started their own knitting circles. Here are several reasons to start a knitting circle for tweens at your library and a step-by-step list on how to get started: relaxation: knitting promotes a relaxing feeling similar to the effects of mediation; it hones general literacy skills, math literacy, and other academic skills; the whole process helps build self esteem, something that is extremely important for everyone but especially tweens; it’s fun way to spend time with friends; it may even help teach people to learn to code. Step 1 Start a knitting club for adults. My adult knitting group meets…

Guest Blogger

Craft Tips for Programs

Over the years of doing crafts with all ages, I’ve learned a thing or two. Here are some tips you can incorporate into your storytimes, after school programs, and outreach programs. The Essentials: School supplies (scissors, glue sticks, colored pencils, markers, crayons) preferably in separate containers so you can control what is being used. Craft sticks (in regular and jumbo size). These are great for making stick puppets. Watercolor paints, paintbrushes, and reusable cups for water. 4 oz. glue containers and glue pump. I like to fill the glue containers just a little bit. There is little waste in case of an overzealous child, or a spill. Lunch bags (to make puppets or to prep materials) and spoons (for mixing materials). Paint palettes and cotton swabs for tempera paints. You won’t waste paint this way, and it’s really easy to clean up! I also use cotton balls to paint with…