Guest Blogger

Resources in Children and Libraries for Supporting Early Literacy Through Play

Play is a crucial aspect of cognitive development in young children. It is recognized by the Every Child Ready to Read program as one of the five key early literacy practices that can help promote reading readiness. Playing, exploring, and experimenting with open-ended materials as well as building concepts through direct experiences with people and objects are essential for healthy growth and development. Further, when parents and caregivers sit down to play and talk with their children they draw out babble and burgeoning language from babies and toddlers. As a result, children who engage in language-rich play in their early years are likely to start school with upwards of 10,000 more words in their oral language vocabulary than peers living in less stimulating environments.

Blogger Library Service to Underserved Children and Their Caregivers committee

Growing Together with your Community

Libraries often need to overcome barriers in order to provide services to those who need them most, but how? There’s no specific answer that will work for every library, so instead we suggest focusing on the idea of planning library services as a growing experience. By this we mean that success is easier to find when we consider the uniqueness of our individual communities and tailor our offerings accordingly, essentially growing our offered services to be more of what our communities want, as opposed to planning exclusively around what we might think they need. The suggestions below include specific examples of ways to employ this mindset, and we hope that they can aid other youth services professionals (especially those looking to reach underserved families) in their planning process. Research and Repeat Growing with your community involves research, and lots of it!  Luckily, research includes everything from sitting down at a…

Guest Blogger

Contribute to Children and Libraries

Have you done something cool at your library?  Coordinated a research project with implications to youth librarianship?  Have something to say but not sure where to share it?  Look no further than Children and Libraries, the quarterly journal published by ALSC.  Children and Libraries (affectionately called CAL) is always on the lookout for articles of interest to ALSC members.   Have you done something cool at your library?  Coordinated a research project with implications to youth librarianship?  Have something to say but not sure where to share it?  Look no further than Children and Libraries, the quarterly journal published by ALSC.  Children and Libraries (affectionately called CAL) is always on the lookout for articles of interest to ALSC members. 

Children and Libraries (CAL)

“Children & Libraries” … and YOU!

Children and Libraries  (CAL) is the journal of the Association for Library Services to Children. “[I]t primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education for librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association”  (http://www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/cal).

Guest Blogger

Coming soon to your mailbox: The spring issue of Children and Libraries

Get ready for your spring issue of Children and Libraries which you will find in your mailbox in early May. Julie Cummins is the guest editor for this special issue celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Caldecott Medal. Julie is a recipient of the 2003 ALSC Distinguished Service Award. Her accomplishments in the field of librarianship include her leadership as the head of the Central Children’s Room at Rochester (N.Y.) Public Library and coordinator of children’s services at New York Public Library. She has served in numerous ALSC and ALA leadership positions; served as an editor, teacher, and consultant; and continues to write children’s books. The Children and Libraries Editorial Advisory committee is thrilled about this special issue, and we’re sure you will be just as pleased! Here’s what’s in store: Author interviews with Brian Selznick and David Wiesner. Never before seen historical photos from past Newbery/Caldecott banquets as well…