Blogger Mary R. Voors

2024 Notable Children’s Digital Media list

The Notable Children’s Digital Media list includes real-time, dynamic, and interactive media content for children 14 years of age and younger that enables and encourages active engagement and social interaction while informing, educating, and entertaining in exemplary ways. Here is the complete list of the Notable Children’s Digital Media selected by the committee for 2023-2024. Thanks to the 2023-24 Notable Children’s Digital Media committee: Interested in the best books and media for children?Review all of the ALSC Book & Media Awards & Book Lists!

Blogger Chelsey Roos

Recovering from Program Failure

Almost everyone has a program completely fail at least once in their career. In library school, I learned how to build a good program, how to market a program, and how to incorporate elements of diversity into programs, but I didn’t learn how to recover when a program does an absolute belly-flop. Let’s look at three common ways a program might crash and burn (they’ve all happened to me!) and some ways you can salvage your time, supplies, or spirit in the face of program disaster.

Audio books

2024 Notable Children’s Recordings list

The Notable Children’s Recordings list includes recordings for children 14 years of age and younger of especially commendable quality that demonstrate respect for young people’s intelligence and imagination; exhibit venturesome creativity; and reflect and encourage the interests of children and young adolescents in exemplary ways. Here is the complete list of the Notable Children’s Recordings for 2024. The Notable Children’s Recordings list includes recordings for children 14 years of age and younger of especially commendable quality that demonstrate respect for young people’s intelligence and imagination; exhibit venturesome creativity; and reflect and encourage the interests of children and young adolescents in exemplary ways. Here is the complete list of the Notable Children’s Recordings for 2024.

Blogger Tess Prendergast

Indigenous Board Books for Every Baby 

We know that the general benefits of reading board books are numerous. Here are just a few reasons why we spend time and money curating and maintaining board book collections for families in our communities to use.  I have noticed a great surge of fantastic board book fare that features Indigenous cultures and languages and believe that all board book collections should be audited for excellent Indigenous content. Here are a few recommendations: Indigenizing board book collections First and foremost, when looking at indigenizing our board book collections, we need to  explore whether there are any resources from the nation whose land we are on right now. It may turn out that there are few or no board book formats of a local nations’ children’s stories and other cultural materials available yet. We can still work in culturally appropriate and respectful ways to learn about (and possibly curate and provide) whatever children’s…

Blogger Laura Schulte-Cooper

Celebrating Love & Books! — Couples Who Collaborate

It’s Valentine’s Day, a day for celebrating love! What better way to honor love on the ALSC Blog than by highlighting some very creative book-making partners who also happen to be married. For years now, ALSC’s journal, Children and Libraries (CAL), has featured Couples Who Collaborate, interviews with successful author/illustrator teams. Today we rewind to 2018-19 and feature three couples who make beautiful books together. Three Decades of Creative Success! Couples Who Collaborate: Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkneyby Jennifer Gibson In December, Book Riot named the creative team of Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney one of the 12 most prolific children’s book authors of all time! They have been collaborating for over 30 years. In this interview for CAL, they discuss the secret of balancing work and family life, their creative process, and the individuals who influenced their careers. From Art Class to Picture Books Couples Who Collaborate:…

Blogger Intellectual Freedom Committee

Quiet Censorship

I have an ugly truth to share: there are materials in my collection that I dislike. I work in a large multi-branch public library system with centralized selection, so I have not been involved with the purchase of any of these materials. My lack of love for some of these items comes from a variety of reasons: poor writing quality, a didactic message, being super commercial. Many are innocuous fluff and aren’t hurting anyone by being available but I still see them as junk food. For the most part, these are books I probably wouldn’t put on display because they are so popular and easy to find already. But I am not opposed to their being on display. Some recent purchases, however, have caused me to pause and think about why I considered not putting these books on display. Did I want to avoid complaints? Or was there something even…

Blogger Suzi Wackerbarth

Banned books in the past: “Goodnight Moon”

Did you know that Goodnight Moon was essentially banned from the New York Public Library from 1947 to 1972? Yesterday I read The Important Thing about Margaret Wise Brown. OH MY. What a treasure trove of library history!! You probably knew about book bans in the 70s with Judy Blume, but did you know about Anne Carroll Moore in the 1940s? Anne Carroll Moore was one of “THE” important librarians for the New York Public Library and she did a lot of great things for the profession, as you will discover in Miss Moore thought Otherwise. However, she didn’t like Margaret Wise Brown’s books. She called them “truck” which was not a nice thing to say. From “The Important Thing…” “When Anne Carroll Moore read the wrong kind of book, she picked up a rubber stamp, which she slammed down BAM! And which said NOT RECOMMENDED FOR PURCHASE BY EXPERT.”…