Blogger Early Childhood Programs and Services committee

Concern for Screentime and Very Young Children in Regards to Virtual Programming

Virtual programming has been the norm for most of the past year for most if not all public libraries. Librarians have expressed concern about how this might impact very young children (toddlers and younger) and their families.  We know that the American Academy of Pediatrics historically discouraged media exposure for children under two but have since eased up with the increased use of Facetime, Zoom and other media communication methods. Asked about this, Sarah R. Lytle, Ph.D., Director of Outreach and Education at the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) at the University of Washington replied: “As you know, the more interactive, the better for younger children. That can mean a caregiver interacting with children around the screen or the child interacting with another adult ‘through’ the screen (i.e., video chat). There is some new research that preschoolers comprehend stories read via video chat just as they do when…

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How to Avoid Being #ALALeftBehind

In the past, if you were one of those poor, unfortunate souls watching on social media as friends enjoyed an ALA conference in some exotic locale (not counting the times Midwinter was in Boston, Chicago, or Philadelphia), you may have lamented being #ALALeftBehind. As someone who suffers greatly from FOMO, I have felt the sting myself. How many books did I miss out on getting signed in the exhibits? How many conversations while waiting in an obscenely long line for coffee? How many amazing sessions? It can be pretty discouraging! Luckily, the AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School/Public Library Cooperation is working to “create an online networking and resource space for the three Youth Divisions to engage around EDI-related topics” (quote taken from committee charge). So while we can’t send you signed books, and you will have to provide your own caffeinated beverage of choice, we will soon have an online…

ALA Virtual Midwinter 2021

We Are Each Other’s Harvest #alamw21

Natalie Baszile, author of We Are Each Other’s Harvest, was a featured speaker at the Diversity in Publishing stage. Baszile’s non-fiction book focuses on Black farmers, and the idea of the importance of land ownership. She stated that most people’s image of a farmer is that of a white man. She wanted to “offer up more than just a history lesson”, and, instead, have readers focus on how land is a part of our identities, and link this to contemporary issues. There were about one million Black farmers in the 1920s, going to about 45,000 today. Why has there been such a decline? To explore this, the book features a series of essays from historians with knowledge in this area. A collection of poems will also be included in the book, interspersed between the other pieces. Baszile stated that this will help the book feel like a celebration. She offered…

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Intellectual Freedom at Midwinter 2021

If you’re like me, sketching out your schedule for sessions and events at ALA conferences is a fun part of anticipating the trip. In our virtual circumstances, we can still plan, but our options have actually expanded, with some sessions offered “on demand” rather than at a specific time.  You can find a great overview of events, along with links, in the schedule at a glance. There is a tremendous line-up of speakers and sessions for Midwinter, and many are closely tied to various principles of intellectual freedom –ideas like equity, access, inclusion, and intellectual property. If these are areas of interest for you, read on!  We’ve combed the schedule to spotlight some amazing IF-related events coming up next week.  For starters: the Office of Intellectual Freedom will introduce the hot-off-the-press 10th Edition of the Intellectual Freedom Manual in an on-demand session.  Viewers get a discount on purchasing a copy. Speakers and Sessions Anti-racism Work and…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Child Mental Health and Technology: A Useful Tool for Caregivers and Therapists

In today’s new normal, we as a society are faced with the many challenges brought on by the Pandemic: Parents have adjusted to working from home. They’ve become teachers. Children have gone from learning in a classroom setting to their bedrooms; having physical movement to being stationary. Where they previously had social interactions with peers, they’re now often in silos watching a single screen throughout the day. After nearly a year of Covid-19, data proves that this has been no easy adjustment by any means. An article by Human Rights Watch outlines just how this disease has devastatingly impacted children around the world. Though what is also discussed are beneficial approaches to alleviate suffering. What I’d like to hone in on is how one organization provides help for the mental health of children due to the effects of Covid-19. Through the National Children’s Alliance , a new useful training is…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

New Year’s Resolution: Inspo 2021

black and white line drawing of a human head in profile with bright idea icon in center

Inspo for 2021 So, we get another shot. The celestial odometer ticks one more trip around the sun. And here goes: some inspo for you to make your 2021 sunny and bright, youth services style! Hygge for Children and Families 30 Phrases That Will Change a Kid’s Day (for the Better) 100+ Indoor Activities to Do with the Kids Re-Arrange! Re-arranging your room is one of the best ways to blow out the cobwebs, literally and metaphorically. Wanna let your fingers do the heavy lifting? Try this free children’s room designer! Create a floor plan with a bird’s-eye view 1. Choose an example from our gallery or create a new design 2. Start with your room’s shape and dimensions, add doors, windows & other features. 3. Browse our furniture and click or drag the icons into your plan. 4. Arrange the pieces to create your perfect set-up You can choose just…