Blogger Liza Purdy

Innovations in the Children’s Library

Our library pulled a lot of our fun toys and manipulatives from our children’s section with the advent of the pandemic. Of course, books and our outdoor programs are still a major draw for families to come to our library, but we’ve been trying to come up with other ways to engage families while they visit the library. Our staff has come up with some terrific innovations!

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Back to school help for Students

To extend our reach and eliminate any barriers to service, we have partnered with our county school system to provide student accounts. Students can use their school account number as a library card, granting them access to print and online library materials.  After a year and a half of virtual school, students are back to in-person learning. Do they have all the materials they need to succeed?  

Blogger Emily Mroczek-Bayci

A deep dive into: Picture Book Categories

How many times has a patron asked you for books about princesses, or Pete the Cat, or colors and you’ve had to ask them for specific titles or to wait a few minutes to consult your computer? The traditional method of organizing books by an authors last name does not allow for brows-ability, especially in a picture book section. That is why many libraries find ways to feature their picture books with face out shelving and to reorganize the picture books into categories or topics. I took a look at local libraries around me and on the Internet to see various trends and ideas for organizing picture books. It seemed like common trends with libraries who employed categories were customer satisfaction, easier brows-ability and increased circulation. Naming it My old library called our organized picture books, “Kids Favorites,” and divided certain books into specific categories while keeping some books in…

Blogger Early Childhood Programs and Services committee

Addressing Covid-19 Worries in the Back-to-School Season

I wrote this in quarantine. My toddler had a close contact exposure to Covid-19 in her daycare class and we kept the whole family home out of an abundance of caution. (Everyone is healthy.) It’s a situation many of our patrons and staff may face now that kids have returned to school or pre-school. The Delta variant put a different spin on the usual back-to-school and fall programming, with many libraries still only allowing outdoor or virtual programming. How can we support our patrons during this fraught back-to-school season? First, remember to take care of yourselves. Burnout, compassion fatigue, Covid fatigue—whatever you call it, it’s real. Try to take some time for yourself whether it’s a staycation, regular exercise, or enjoying a hobby. Next, understand the behaviors associated with stress and worry in your patrons. If folks share with you, validate their feelings. Fellow Early Childhood Programs and Services Committee…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Homework Help

It’s that time of year.  Kids are back in school and will soon be coming into the library for homework and research, not just for pleasure reading.  I admit…I have always  enjoyed helping children find the answers they need to a homework question.  I find it strangely satisfying.  And this year, as the pandemic continues, students are going to need our support more than ever.  How can we help? 

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Tween/Teen Privacy: Inside and Outside the Library

Privacy and intellectual freedom go hand in hand, once you think about it. The ability to explore new ideas and information -without fear of judgement or repercussions- directly supports the growth of intellectual freedom. As tweens and teens seek knowledge to understand themselves and their place in the world, they benefit from protections inside, and knowledge outside, the library. Here are some resources that may be useful in thinking about working with teens and tweens in your library!

Blogger Liza Purdy

A Little Marie Kondo for the Children’s Department

You all know Marie Kondo, right? She of the Spark Joy fame? I love watching her shows on Netflix. I just watched a new season last week, and it inspired me to think about decluttering our library’s programs a bit, now that our Fall session is underway. We are still in a strange “not quite where we used to be, but not mid-pandemic either” place, so I thought it would be a good time to reflect on activities that we embraced during the pandemic to see whether they are worth keeping. What changes did we make that the public really embraced? What did we love as a staff? What is everyone just OVER?