Blogger Tess Prendergast

Diversifying Our Storytime Book Selections

Do you have a shelf of go-to books for your storytimes? These books probably have big, bright illustrations, engaging text that invites participation, and are just a blast to read aloud. But are many of your storytime books about caterpillars, puppies, and trucks? If storytime is for all kids, should they also see kids like themselves in the books we share with them?

Blogger Early & Family Literacy committee

Fostering the Growth of Executive Functioning Skills in Children

The term executive functioning refers to an important set of skills that allow people to successfully navigate life. These skills include the ability to plan, self-evaluate, self-control, retain information, manage time, and organize thoughts and information. According to a useful infographic published by Harvard, these abilities are not innate to anyone, but may be learned by nearly everyone. Children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old tend to develop these skills rather rapidly, and this development is significantly bolstered by early childhood education and care (ECEC).  An exploratory report was published in May of this year, examining the effect of ECEC on children’s executive functioning skills at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to these important skills, the study also examined the effect of this care on language, and the difference socioeconomic status may make on the development of vocabulary and executive functioning. The study looked…

Blogger Early & Family Literacy committee

Research Matters

The ALSC Board charged the Early and Family Literacy Committee (EFL) to “identify, synthesize, and disseminate current research findings relevant to early and family literacy issues from library schools, scholars of education, and other advocacy sources to libraries, childcare providers, and community agencies serving young children (birth through age 8).” 

Blogger School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Pandemic Connections: Being an ALSC Mentor/Mentee in 2021

The ALSC Mentoring program seeks to match individuals with an interest in library service to children together to learn from each other and support ALSC’s goals. Each person comes to the program with their own hopes, ideas and experiences and the program is well structured to support both mentor and mentee in connecting productively over a fairly short period of time, January- June.

ALA Midwinter 2020

Exploring Our Five Senses at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Oh, the Things We Saw and Felt! On Friday, January 24th, the ALSC Special Collections and Bechtel Fellowship and a few special guests were treated to a behind-the-scenes type of tour of the recent “Our Five Senses Exhibit” at the Rare Book Department, Parkway Central Library, Free Library of Philadelphia.  We were amazed at the interactivity and book magic that was demonstrated in this popular exhibit.  It was co-curated by ALSC Member Christopher Brown, Special Collections Curator, Children’s Literature Research Collection and co-curator and our tour guide Karen Kirsheman, Librarian, Rare Book Department. Inspired by Aliki’s children’s picture book work and the original artwork from her 1962 book My Five Senses, a gift to the Children’s Literature Research Collection, this exhibition was such a hit with families early on that it was extended.  Original art was created by local children’s picture book and Geisel Award-winning author/illustrator Greg Pizzoli to help…

ALA Midwinter 2020

ALA Stop: Free exhibitions at the Free Library

I’m excited that ALA is in Philadelphia this year, because I promise you’ll be spoiled for choice at all of the activities that the City has to offer.  Museums and restaurants are the heart of Philadelphia, but for a truly unforgettable experience, I hope you’ll stop by the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Parkway Central Library and tour our Special Collection spaces.

Blogger Renee Grassi

Guidelines for Library Services to Individuals with Dyslexia

If I am helping a parent find books for their child who is beginning to read, I would take them to our library’s Easy Reader section. But for children with dyslexia, reading is anything but easy.  What can libraries do, then, to help support these children in their literacy development? Librarians already have a road map to help them develop inclusive library services for individuals with dyslexia and other learning differences.  The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has published a revised and extended version of their Guidelines for Library Services to Persons with Dyslexia.  IFLA’s guidelines are intended as a tool for both trained and less experienced library staff members who are responsible for serving those with reading and learning difficulties. Along with these guidelines, IFLA has published a best practices document featuring successful and replicable service models from libraries around the world. The intention is to provide a thorough and up-to-date…