Blogger Erika Hogan

Sustainability and Children’s Services

Earth Day is one month away, but what happens all year long matters just as much, maybe more. Ever since the ALA endorsed sustainability as a core value, there’s a recognition of the key leadership role libraries can play in community knowledge and resilience in response to climate change. While I often plan programs around nature-based activities, getting youth outdoors to appreciate the natural world is only one step toward ecological thinking. After joining my library’s sustainability team, I’ve begun to center thinking about the kinds of practices that lend themselves to children’s programs and services with a lighter eco-footprint. Here I’d like to share some reflections and resources I’ve found helpful on my continuing journey toward greater sustainability in children’s services.

Blogger School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Wanted – Citizen Scientists!

We are born scientists.  Babyhood is one big science experiment after another. We test the limits of gravity (oopsy!), we identify and classify (a skunk is NOT a kitty) and we are constantly performing experiments (water plus dirt equals MUD!). Humankind is where we are because of the myriads of creatures before us that explored our surroundings and drove our knowledge forward.  After all, there could be no trip to Mars without discovering fire first! With all the STEAM push, you could be excused for thinking that learning about science is what all the kids want – but let’s be honest, learning how to Do science would be a much better way of getting kids on board. And what better way to learn about science than by doing science and collecting data that actually makes a real world difference! Scientist as a full time occupation is a fairly new concept….

Guest Blogger

Children In Crisis

REFORMA (The National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-Speaking) and ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children) have worked together for years, so it’s no surprise that their combined efforts have been so successful in addressing the reading needs of children, especially migrant children.  When unaccompanied minors began arriving at the U.S. border from Central America in 2014, our goal was to provide some sort of assistance. And what better way than to share books in the language of the arriving children.

Blogger Tess Prendergast

COVID Babies in the Library

In a Disability Scoop article about so-called “COVID-babies”, author Adam Clark explores various ways that the pandemic has affected children’s development. Clark begins with a vignette about a two-year old named Charlie who is in speech therapy to help him learn to speak more than one-word utterances. Nancy Polow, one of the speech-pathologists interviewed in the article, is quoted as saying “I have never seen such an influx of infants and toddlers unable to communicate. We call these children COVID babies.” The good news is that lots of the kids like Charlie who are now turning up at speech therapy centers quickly make strides. After reading this, I found some emerging evidence that being gestated during the early part of the pandemic is associated with some developmental lags. Babies born to two groups of mothers (those who were and those who were not infected with COVID during their pregnancies) were…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Planning for SRP 2023 STEMming Summer Slide

Summer slide. I know I am preaching to the choir here, but it is still a thing. Ideally, addressing summer slide should be a part of your annual goals or tasks, much like summer reading or Banned Books Week. Even more ideal, if there is such a thing, is partnering with schools and other local agencies. First, though, as my old college professor used to say, we can’t discuss a topic without defining it first. So, here we go. What is summer slide and why should I care? Summer slide, and I think Colorado Dept of Education puts it best is: (T)he tendency for students, especially those from low-income families, to lose some of theachievement gains they made during the previous school year. Why you should care Summer slide can affect almost any child. However, the children it impacts the most are the most socioeconomically disadvantaged. Here’s a thousand words…

Blogger Amy Steinbauer

It’s a Beautiful Day in Your Neighborhood: Creating a Serviceable Service Map

It's a Beautiful Day in Your Neighborhood

My system is rethinking, relaunching, and rediscovering what our community and neighborhoods are like right now, and how the library can fit into our local communities. It feels like the perfect time to start this work, as our neighborhoods have been pretty closed off the last couple of years to keep us safe. I warned my staff when our fiscal year started in October, that pretty much all they would hear from me this year is the word: Resetting. And that word is perfect as a launch to reset yourself in the community, and reconnect.