Blogger Early Childhood Programs and Services committee

Focusing on Pronouns @ Baby Storytime

Hello! My name is Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez and I use she/her pronouns. I’m a children’s librarian for Washington County Library at the Park Grove Library in Cottage Grove, MN. This is my first ALSC blog post and I’m excited to share how I address pronouns at baby storytime! Baby storytimes are the ideal place to foster conversations with grown-ups so they are more likely to talk with their babies (or toddlers) about the same content at home. Pronouns are often an important part of someone’s identity. Therefore, I find it important to talk about pronouns at storytimes regularly and focus on them specifically a few times a year.  For baby storytime, I like to use The Pronoun Book and integrate the three most oftenly used pronouns in the songs and rhymes.  These pronouns include:  The main rhyme I like to pair with this text is Little Mousie Brown. I encourage grown-ups…

Blogger Tess Prendergast

Picture Book Playtime: An Inclusive, ECRR-Inspired Early Literacy Program Model 

I have not run storytime in a long time as I left the library to start teaching in a MLIS program almost 5 years ago. Not going to lie, I really miss working with little kids and their grown-ups! One of the last programs I ran was called Picture Book Playtime. It is a simple station-based program that I adapted from others I had read about. My goal was to make something totally inclusive that offered various ways for the ECRR practice of writing to be highlighted. In these sessions, I had a very diverse group of kids attend, including kids who had developmental disabilities, and recent newcomer families who were new to English. Everyone thrived. Moreover, the adults (parents, nannies, grand-parents, etc.) all helped each other out. It was important to me that I kept the group small, structured with some room for flexibility on the fly, simple, low-cost,…

Blogger Tess Prendergast

Bring on the Night: Perfect Picture Books for Bedtime and Anytime

The arrival of shorter days and longer nights up here in the Northern hemisphere is a bit of conundrum for me. I love the autumn weather and watching the trees change color but seriously do not love getting up for work while it’s still dark outside. However, all year round I love picture books featuring night-time themes. It might have something to do with how easy it is to recommend them as bedtime stories. It makes sense that reading books that take place at night will suit the situation of getting kids ready for bed as the sun goes down. Or, perhaps I am just into the visual aesthetic of night-time scenes and enjoy the many creative ways that illustrators portray them with shadows and glowing images. Whatever the reasons, I thought this was the perfect time of year to share some of my favorite night-themed picture-books with you all.  Noisy Night by…

Blogger Ariel Barreras

Early Literacy Program Ideas for Your Library!

Storytime is an essential part of children’s librarianship; it is the first time children are in a more “formal” environment to learn and develop school-readiness skills, and parents and caregivers learn more about early literacy skills. While we try to touch upon the five early literacy practices in our storytimes, there are other engaging early literacy programs that hit these skills! In this post, I will highlight some early literacy program ideas that you can create for your library. Playdough Playtime Who doesn’t love playdough? With this program, your patrons will be able to cover all five early literacy practices! The key to this program is having the right playdough mats for the children to work with. I have been conducting this program for over a year now and it continues to grow because it is fun and educational. Some playmats that I have provided include the alphabet, numbers, nursery…

Blogger Tess Prendergast

The Science of Reading: A Primer for Children’s Library Staff

I hope you enjoyed last month’s post called Understanding the Simple View of Reading. I am grateful for the positive feedback I have received. I think that it is vital for children’s library staff to understand how reading develops and how to support it. To inform how I teach my children’s library services and children’s literature courses, I recently joined the International Literacy Association. I immediately noticed many of the emerging resources are about something I have also been hearing a lot about in news media, as well as things like Reading Rockets. You may have heard about it recently too: The Science of Reading. What is the Science of Reading? The term “The Science of Reading” collectively refers to the vast, interdisciplinary body of research evidence gathered and published over several decades about how proficient reading and writing develop and how to prevent and address reading difficulties. It is important to note that…