Blogger Abby Johnson

Evaluating Native American Books

It’s November. Depending on your community, this may be a time when teachers and patrons were clamoring for books about Native American nations. I blogged earlier this month about Thanksgiving books, and now the holiday is over and Native American Heritage Month is drawing to a close. As books come back onto your shelves, it’s the perfect time for evaluating Native American books in your collection. Here are some areas to take a look at.

Blogger Chelsey Roos

Simple Ways to Be More Inclusive of Autistic Families

Making your programs more inclusive of autistic families (and families with other sensory needs or disabilities) doesn’t have to take a lot of time or money. There are small, simple changes that you can make in an hour or less today that will help autistic families feel welcome and supported at your library programs (not just storytime).┬áHere are four ways to get started.

Blogger Abby Johnson

Thanksgiving Books Without the Myth

Thanksgiving books are probably the most sought-after holiday books in my library. As a white librarian who strives to do less harm, Thanksgiving books give me pause. Children are still being taught the Thanksgiving myth, while some people consider Thanksgiving a day of mourning. We serve all of them as members of our community. How can we fulfill the demand for books while avoiding harmful stereotypes and misinformation?

Blogger Chelsey Roos

Supporting AAC-Users in the Library

October is AAC Awareness Month! AAC stands for “augmentative and alternative communication,” and it’s often used to refer to a tool that can help someone communicate without speech, like a picture board or a tablet with a communication application. It can be as simple as a white board, or as high tech as a computer that can detect the user’s eye movements and translate them to speech. Someone who is non-speaking, or has difficulty speaking, can use their AAC to communicate with others. Let’s learn a little bit about AAC devices and how you can support AAC-users in the library.

Blogger Abby Johnson

LGBT History Month at Your Library

Did you know that October is LGBT History Month? High school teacher Rodney Wilson, the first openly gay K-12 teacher in Missouri, started this annual observance in 1994. Why October? It’s a month schools are in session, the first national march for gay and lesbian rights was held in October 1979, and National Coming Out Day has been held on October 11 since 1988. (Source: https://lgbthistorymonth.com/ ) Celebrate this significant month by displaying or featuring books about LGBT history. Not sure where to start? Read on for suggestions!

Blogger Abby Johnson

Pride Month at Your Library

June is LGBTQ+ Pride Month! How does your library commemorate Pride Month and/or welcome rainbow kids and families throughout the year? My library is planning a month of Pride programs for the first time this year. I am really excited because this programming and outreach is way overdue. When you’re new at Pride programming, where can you turn? I’ve collected some great resources for you to check out here.

Blogger Abby Johnson

Advocating for Diverse Books

I went to a grown-up pre-conference at the 2022 PLA Conference: Actively Anti-Racist Service to Leisure Readers (check out our PLA 2022 live blogging here!). Many times when choosing conference sessions, I look for content specific to youth librarianship. It’s what I know, it’s what I do. But here’s your sign to look outside our youth librarian box now and then. Although the presenters, Robin Bradford, Alene Moroni, and Becky Spratford are experienced in adult services, everything they said translates easily to youth collections. I want to share my takeaways advocating for diverse books in your collections.