Blogger Jonathan Dolce

19 Positive Summer Reading Activities During COVID

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Adapt If COVID has taught me anything, it is to keep in mind the one-word slogan of Navy SEALS: Adapt. We are public librarians. We adapt. We adapted during the digital age to maintain our relevance. COVID is not going to stop us. Irrespective of where you are right now, summer reading has boiled down to three options: passive, curbside or virtual. We remain in the unique position of being able to touch the lives and hearts of our community. We have a responsibility to remain positive, and to disseminate hope. Read on to see how 19 positive summer reading activities during COVID can make the difference. 1 – Radio I’ll never forget growing up the impact just one radio station had on my hometown. The station was 45 minutes away by car, but everyone in my school knew it; always had it on. You couldn’t see the DJs, but…

Blogger School-Age Programs and Service Committee

New Adventures with Virtual Programs for Children

The School-Age Programs and Services Committee recently met online to discuss our next steps during these wild, unprecedented times. If it wasn’t clear before, it certainly has become so in recent weeks: so much of the work we do as librarians relies on face-to-face interactions. How do we provide programs and services to young people when we’re prohibited from doing so in person? Additionally, when so many young people are spending several hours a day attending school online, how do we reach out in a way that isn’t requiring additional online media saturation?

Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries

Transitioning to Virtual Programming: You Already Know the Basics!

I know, I know, I know, if you are a children’s librarian or programmer, everywhere you look on blogs, Facebook groups, other social media, you are probably seeing a lot of conversation related to virtual programming. The do’s, the don’ts, the how’s. What platform is best? Should you use live programming? Should you use recorded programming? What do you do about copyright?

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Children, Pornography and Suicide

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Children, Pornography and Suicide I know that Children, Pornography and Suicide are terms you never want to hear in tandem.  As tough as it is, it is a reality.  Most of us work with children who are at-risk.  And as Chris Crutcher once said, “When you work with at-risk children, you are going to lose some.  I don’t like that answer”. The CDC reported in 2019 that: “the number of young people dying of suicide jumped…56% between 2007 and 2017“ That’s people aged 10-24 years of age, well within our realm of service. While we don’t want to think of any child as being capable of “looking up porn”, the reality is, it is ubiquitous.  We know how to lock our doors from strangers, and how to train children to recognize a multitude of dangers.  We understand that substance abuse claims over 70,000 children every year in the U.S.  But think…

Blogger Kaitlin Frick

Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, Oh My!: Making Social Media Work for You

We often think of using social media as a means to share book recommendations and details about upcoming programs/events. These are such natural extensions of library services, so if your system is using social media (hopefully they are), you’re probably already generating this type of content. But what do you do when your feed starts to feel like the same-old posts on repeat? And what less conventional uses of these tools could your library possibly benefit from?