Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Hispanic Heritage Month 2018! İCelebramos!

Hispanic Heritage Month is here! Let’s celebrate!  Hispanic Heritage Month comes every year, from September 15 to October 15.  There’s tons we can do to celebrate, include our Hispanic patrons.  Hispanic Heritage Month is about bringing everyone together to recognize all that Hispanic Americans have brought to American culture. And WHY celebrate, you may ask? — https://www.ajc.com/news/fast-facts-hispanic-heritage-month/lzbTmY6zExcR2wAmeb24wL/ Resources for All Not sure where to begin?  Let’s start at the top!  There’s a multitude of resources for all, whether you are confident in your Spanish or not. The Library of Congress has a great page complete with its own calendar that you could adapt to your own programming.  Remember, this is about inclusion.  Make our Hispanic patrons feel welcome, and relevant!  The Library of Congress site has something for everyone.  Select from images, to multimedia, to lesson plans that are easy to adapt to children’s programming. The Smithsonian Latino Center has another…

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Multicultural Musings: The Virginia Hamilton Conference

I’ve recently taken a deep dive into my family genealogy.  Besides a lot of research into old historical documents, I took a DNA test and discovered that I’m as Italian as I thought I was—a fact about which I am extremely happy, long being proud of the heritage and birthplace of all four of my grandparents.  I also discovered a trace amount of Iberian and Senegalese DNA.  Could Moorish Spain be in my past?  I just love the idea that I am connected to yet another part of history.  I’m now itching to read up on the subject.   Thinking about culture always leads me into thoughts on diversity.  I am a white librarian working in a community that is overwhelmingly African-American.  I grew up loving books and I want the children I work with to feel the same.  I think it’s the responsibility of all children’s librarians to read…

Children's Literature (all forms)

To the de Grummond We Will Go

A Road Trip Diary of the Special Collections & Bechtel Committee Our road trip began bright and early at 6:30am on the Friday before ALA Annual in New Orleans…  Four members of the 2017-18 Bechtel Committee met up with Clair Frederick (President of MerryMakers Inc.) and ALSC member Susannah Richards. We set off together for the two-hour trip to Hattiesburg, Mississippi, home of the University of Southern Mississippi Golden Eagles and the de Grummond Children’s Literature Collection. Upon our arrival at McCain Library, we were greeted by ALSC member and Curator of the de Grummond Collection, Ellen Hunter Ruffin. Ruffin introduced us to Jennifer Brannock (Curator of Rare Books and Mississippiana), who welcomed the group and talked about the current exhibit in the Archives’ Reading Room, “Spaced Out”.  We were amazed at the novelty and range of children’s books on display, with the focus on their cover designs. The display…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Where to Find Free Children’s eBooks

Photo instructions for the hand movements to the rhyme "baa baa black sheep" and

It seems like even the family cat has access to a device, so it’s no surprise that even our youngest readers are utilizing eBooks. While our library collections are full of exciting new content (read along ebooks, beginning readers, and picture books to name just a few), sometimes nothing hits the quality reading spot quite like sharing a classic title. And best of all, there’s no such thing as a holds queue when reading classics with a free and legal public domain download. Where can I find free titles? So many books, so little time! You want to make sure you’re using yours effectively. Whether you’re reading on a phone, tablet, dedicated e-reader, or desktop computer you’ll find more than enough titles for your “for later” list. You’ll find public domain titles on multiple sites, so it’s really all about the reading experience. It’s a bit like choosing your phone’s operating…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Serving Children in Crisis

Proactive Response In a recent NPR article, Vicky Smith of Kirkus Reviews pointed out that in the face of the global immigrant and refugee crisis, “It is a real desire on the part of authors, illustrators and publishers to respond to the crisis in a way that is proactive and helpful.”  In reality, the aim of youth services librarians is precisely the same. Our occupation combats and seeks to ameliorate illiteracy, and act as a social equalizer.  What is more, we seek to provide a proactive response to social issues in the only way we know how. If you find yourself confronted with the question of “why”, here’s your response, put best by Flying Eye Books (of Nobrow Press): “In the wake of the cruelties happening to immigrant children all over the globe, but most recently in the US with children coming across the Mexican border, many of us are shocked. The…

Books

Read any good nonfiction recently?

The 2019 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Committee is asking the ALSC membership to submit book titles for consideration.  The Sibert Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United States in English during the preceding year. For the complete terms and criteria, please refer to the ALSC website. Please remember: Only books from the 2018 publishing year are under consideration for the award. Also, please note that publishers, authors, illustrators, or editors may not suggest their own titles. Go to http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/2019-media-award-suggestions to post your suggestion. You will need to have your ALA login & password handy to access the suggestion forms. The submission deadline is October 15, 2018 for the Sibert Medal. Kathy Jarombek Chair, 2019 Robert F. Sibert Medal Committee

Blogger Kaitlin Frick

Let’s Talk About Diversity… with Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich

Those of you familiar with my ALSC posts will recognize a definite trend, but in case you’re late to the party or somehow stumbled here by mistake and have decided to stick around awhile, I’ll catch you up: I’m passionate about diversity, equity, and inclusivity – especially when it comes to children’s literature. So once a month, an author/illustrator who shares that passion stops by my library to booktalk diverse reads they love. This year, I’ve posted lists from Melissa Iwai and Isabel Roxas, and I’ve heard from a lot of you who are interested in seeing more.