Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Children’s Librarians Are Experts at Building Collections That Reflect Their Communities

One of the things I love most about my job is collection development.  I love keeping an eye out for titles that may appeal to one or two reluctant readers I know, and buying books that I think may become new favoritesr. What I really love though, is buying books that beautifully reflect my local and global communities in an accurate way.

Blogger Public Awareness Committee

Thanksgiving Under the Microscope

Now that Thanksgiving has passed and the holiday books begin to make their way back to your shelves, it’s the perfect time to train your critical eye upon this sometimes-controversial, and frequently inaccurate and inauthentic, array of titles. As librarians and purveyors of information, we have a duty to provide resources that reflect truth and diversity. Many of our books often share the “First Thanksgiving” narrative that shows happy Pilgrims and American Indians* sharing a meal blissfully side by side. Or, this narrative shows up as a classic school play where children dress up.

Awards & Scholarships

Are YOU offering a Mock YMA Election This Year?

Get ready to submit your Mock YMA results! Is your library offering a Mock Newbery or Mock Sibert discussion and election this year? Maybe your classroom or school is offering a Mock Caldecott or Coretta Scott King? Or perhaps your book discussion group is offering a Mock Printz or a Mock Pura Belpré election? We all want to see what your group thinks will be selected as the “best of the best” in young people’s literature!

Author Spotlight

34th Annual Virginia Hamilton Conference

Last week, I attended the 34th Annual Virginia Hamilton Conference at Kent State University, focusing on multicultural literature for children and young adults.  Living in Northeast Ohio, I have attended several times in the past; however, this year I am a newly minted member of the Conference’s Advisory Board and got to see a bit “behind the curtain” of the event as well. In addition, this year was unusual.  The typical April date was changed to October to be combined with a Literacy Conference Kent State was hosting this year, and that content was also included in breakdown sessions. The Conference began Thursday evening with dinner, the Arnold Adoff Poetry Awards, and one of the Conference’s three keynote speakers, poet Marilyn Nelson. Present to pick up their poetry awards, and to read excerpts from their work, were winner Nikki Grimes (One Last Word) and honor recipients Hope Anita Smith (My Daddy…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Book to Film: The House with a Clock in its Walls

Just in time for Halloween, a classic of the kidlit horror genre was adapted into a film. John Bellairs first published The House with a Clock in its Walls in 1973, a time of unrest and upheaval in the United States and around the world. It feels surprisingly fresh when read in 2018. 21st-Century readers will be forgiven for finding the opening chapter of The House with a Clock in its Walls a bit familiar. Recently orphaned, loner Lewis is on his way to live with an uncle he’s never met. And yet, what Lewis finds when he arrives at his Uncle’s wondrous and sinister home is the stuff of both dreams and terrible, terrible nightmares. Uncle Jonathan is a wizard, and somewhere in his house there is a clock placed by the malevolent former owners of the home. It’s ticking down towards something, but no one knows what. In…

Blogger Pamela Groseclose

A Hogwarts Reading List : Hufflepuff

In honor of the United State ’s twentieth-anniversary publishing of Harry Potter, I have been a sharing a book list once a month to highlight books tweens should read based on their Harry Potter House. In April, I books every Slytherin should read.  In July, I highlighted books every Gryffindor should read, and in August I highlighted books every Ravenclaw should read. This month I will be highlighting the final house the Hufflepuffs! 

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Hispanic Heritage Month: Guided by our Leaders

Hispanic Heritage Month Continues! First, though, I always like to explain the “why”.  Why, Jonathan must we celebrate this every year? Here’s a quote for you that encapsulates the “why” the best, IMHO: Hispanic Heritage Month runs from September 15 to October 15 every year.  More than a time to celebrate the contributions of Hispanic Americans, this is a time to celebrate the continued inclusion of diverse materials into your everyday programming.  Inclusion does not have to be like hiding the pill.  As a matter of fact, it should never feel forced.  If it does not feel genuine to you, it will come across that way to your audience.  So, how to proceed?  Where do you seek inspiration or than this amazing blog? Inspiration from Leaders The 2018 Estela & Raúl Mora Award winners were announced just a few days ago.  What better way to explore your options than to draw inspiration…