Blogger Chelsey Roos

Supporting AAC-Users in the Library

October is AAC Awareness Month! AAC stands for “augmentative and alternative communication,” and it’s often used to refer to a tool that can help someone communicate without speech, like a picture board or a tablet with a communication application. It can be as simple as a white board, or as high tech as a computer that can detect the user’s eye movements and translate them to speech. Someone who is non-speaking, or has difficulty speaking, can use their AAC to communicate with others. Let’s learn a little bit about AAC devices and how you can support AAC-users in the library.

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Music and Story time Programs  

“Music baby.” by cross-eyed doll is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. How do you incorporate music into your story time programs? Has this gotten more difficult as more music has gone in the direction of  streaming? This was a recent and interesting discussion on ALA Connect. In the past, we used CDs, but some of us moved on to streaming. This may be great for listening  – but problematic for story time programs. What works best—Spotify? YouTube? Apple Music? Amazon? Dropbox? CDs? To pay or not to pay?   We polled ALSC’s Childrens and Technology committee members to see how each of our systems tackle this issue. The solutions are varied and work for those of us who use them, but they may not work for all.   With CDs, availability is the issue as they are neither being produced nor purchased as much. If you still have CDs, one option is…

Children & Technology

Hybrid Programming: Evaluating Takeaways from the Pandemic and Moving Library Services Into the Future

In May, the Children & Technology committee presented a We Are ALSC Chat (WAAC) on the topic of hybrid programming in libraries. Our committee was inspired to host this conversation because the evolving nature of library programming (primarily in public libraries) has been a recurring theme in our own committee meetings throughout this term. We were also excited to bring in other library professionals as guests who have expertise, and a variety of experiences on the subject. The conversation was robust, and just what we were hoping for! Below are a few takeaways. Defining “Hybrid Programming” To start this conversation, we wanted to name that the term “hybrid programming” itself does not have one definition. It might mean live streaming, providing at-home kits, offering post-attendance incentives, brainstorming activities that have both virtual and in-person opportunities, and more. The underlying key to success being hands-on engagement and interactivity regardless of the…

Administrative and Management Skills

Digital Media Resources updated for 2022

Hello Friends! We have some exciting news to share. The ALSC Digital Media Resources page has been updated. This list, created and updated annually by the ALSC Children and Technology Committee, curates current digital and tech articles, blog posts, and websites impacting the youth services field. This year we’ve added some new categories–media mentorship and podcast advisory–and updated recommendations on the familiar topics of children’s eBooks and apps, early learning, and research. Each section’s resources are selected with focused attention on the interactions of children and technology. 

Blogger School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Adapting virtual program tools to in-person programs

One of my library’s programs that pivoted entirely to a virtual format and has now pivoted back to fully in person is NYPL After School. This is a free drop in program for kids aged 6-12 that takes place after regular school hours, Monday through Thursday, from October-June, when school is in session. We launched September 27, 2021 in 20 branches and are so excited to welcome back our patrons in person with a program designed to meet them where they are and help them recover both literacy skills and supportive connections with caring adults.

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Meaningful Technology in a School Library Environment

If you had asked me at the beginning of my graduate program what my end goal was in terms of a library job, I would not have known to list Technology Integrator at a Middle School. However, upon getting a part-time library job at an independent school in Brooklyn that eventually turned into a full-time opportunity, that is the role I ended up in. As I prepare to start my third school year in this position – with a pandemic and pivot into full-time remote learning facilitation in the middle – I am now so immersed in EdTech tools, hybrid learning, and device troubleshooting that I have acquired an entirely new language and skillset that many may not even associate with a library degree. 

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

TECHNOLOGY HELP AND FAMILIES: Going A Little Deeper

When we think of technology, children and families, access has been what has been most prevalent at issue for many libraries, especially in the last few years. We have prioritized equity, diversity and inclusion in our guiding principle statements. We’re ensuring that we are serving the most underserved communities: Reviewing and realigning our service areas to focus on the schools, and day cares which have the greatest need populations – that they are the first to receive laptops, wifi access, and technology assistance. All these things are a necessary and wonderful enhancement for families and for closing the digital divide. I would say though, that we can go even deeper in assisting families. This is what I discovered in the past pandemic year as I worked with families from different countries.

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Technology Planning: One Library’s Story

Moving Our Library into the Technology Age Technology is growing and we need to grow with it. Every household, young child, teen and adult uses technology on a daily basis, whether in their own home or at a public facility, like our library. The Beginning of a New Journey Being a small library we struggled with getting technology to our patrons. It just wasn’t in our budget to support that kind of expense. Up until about two years ago, we only had three access computers for all of our patrons to use. We had to find another way, a way to get technology in the hands of our patrons, especially our students. We were very fortunate to have access and the ability to apply for a grant from the Illinois State Library for that very resource. With acceptance of the grant we were able to order Laptops and IPads for…