Blogger Kaitlin Frick

A Few of Our Favorite… Authors

November 1st is National Author’s Day, and what better way to celebrate than to hype some amazing authors you – and your patrons – should definitely be reading? Much like my August post, which focused on humorous book recommendations, I’ve asked some of the best librarians I know to weigh in. The question I posed: If you could only read children’s books by one author for an entire year, who would it be and why? All answers are in the words of the librarians themselves.

Blogger Early Childhood Programs and Services committee

Storytime Books That Will Make Grownups Laugh

Storytime is an integral part of being a children’s librarian. One of the biggest frustrations I’ve come across is keeping the grownups engaged. From ALSC’s Early Childhood Programs and Services Committee (ECPS) Cookies and Conversation, one way to engage parents is by reading books with jokes that adults will also find funny.

Blogger Kaitlin Frick

The Librarian Listened: Helping Children and Caregivers Handle Mental Health Conditions

According to the Child Mind Institute’s 2018 Children’s Mental Health Report, anxiety affects 30% of children and adolescents, but 80% never get help. Untreated anxiety disorders, which typically manifest between ages 11-14, increase the risk for depression, school failure, substance abuse and suicide. What can we, as librarians, do to assist young people and their caregivers in recognizing and dealing with mental health conditions?

Blogger Gretchen Schulz

Book Recommendations: September 11 Remembrance

Good Morning, Today marks 18 years since the terrorist attacks against our United States on September 11, 2001. In observation of this, I have compiled a list of book recommendations for those interested in educating their young children of this historical day, and for grade schooler and middle schoolers interested in learning about or commemorating this day.

Blogger Amy Steinbauer

Wordless Books in Story Time

I recently observed a story time of a newer story time presenter. I saw their passion and playfulness with the preschool crowd, but felt them trip over the words of the story a bit. Afterwards, we followed up– and I admitted that I only take the words of the books as a suggestion. A tip that I love sharing with parents and caregivers— you don’t have to read every word of the book, every time you read that book. There are many retellings of favorite books, and words are only one part of the story for “reading” the book. 

Books

World Breastfeeding Week – Books for Your Library

The Background Last Week was World Breastfeeding Week (WBW). This special time is celebrated across the globe every year from August 1-7 to support and increase awareness of breastfeeding. WBW commemorates the Innocenti Declaration, signed in August 1990, by government policymakers, the World Health Organization (WHO), and UNICEF to promote and protect this important first food. Breastfeeding is a human right; it saves lives; and it helps communities. However, there is very little in the way of children’s books on this important topic.

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Risking Everything: explaining migration and internment

Risking Everything For freedom, a new life, or just a chance at life, people worldwide migrate.  Be it climate change, political strife, or economics, we live in an age of mass migration.  How we react to it as information professionals and caretakers of our community’s children is critical.  Daily, we are being tapped for explanations for these crises as well as internment.  This tugs at our heart strings, and reminds us of US’ origins and populations fleeing religious persecution in 17th century Europe. Or fleeing famine during the Irish Potato Famine. Internment Explaining internment to grade-schooled aged children can be difficult at best.  But one selection that can help illustrate the feelings behind this: The One and Only Ivan.  There’s even a movie of it, but here’s the book trailer:                                        …