Blogger Maria Trivisonno

FamilySpace at the Library

Several years ago, before the COVID-19 outbreak, Invest in Children, a community wide public/private partnership administered by the Cuyahoga County Office of Early Childhood, and the United Way of Greater Cleveland came to the two largest library systems in Northeast Ohio (Cleveland Public Library (CPL) and Cuyahoga County Public Library (CCPL)—the largest suburban system for which I work) with an idea.  Although delayed thanks to the pandemic, the first FamilySpace location opened in September 2022 at CCPL’s Garfield Heights Branch, and three other locations (two in each system total) followed.  The response has been positive, to say the least.

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Like Kids with New Toys: A Closer Look at the USA Toy Library Association

Thanks to Every Child Ready to Read 2nd edition, children’s librarians have explicit permission to promote play as an integral part of early literacy and developmental skills for young children.  Isn’t it just the best job ever?  I have ALWAYS been a huge fan of toys, since, er, birth.  And getting to pass that joy to a new generation—and encourage their parents and caregivers to rediscover their own inner children—is a delight!

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

The 35th Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth

Back in February 2020, the board of the Virginia Hamilton Conference (of which I am a member) was eagerly planning the 35th anniversary of the longest-running event in the United States to focus exclusively on multicultural literature for children and young adults.  We were especially excited that our keynote speaker, illustrator Floyd Cooper, was planning on visiting area schools in conjunction with the Conference. And then…2020. 

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Librarians Do the Darndest Things

There are so many unique roads to librarianship.  I know children’s librarians who are former teachers…along with some who are former lawyers. One colleague did a stint as an archeologist.  I, myself, was a television producer (long story!).  And some librarians continue to do cool jobs while being a librarian.  I’m friends with more than a few crafters extraordinaire, for example. 

Blogger Maria Trivisonno

Developing Executive Function @ the Library

Ever since Every Child Ready to Read focused children’s librarianship on scientific research and empowered librarians to see themselves as experts who can speak to parents, our field has increasingly looked to brain development to support our practices and inform what we do.  Early literacy, however, is not the only growth going on in the brains of our early childhood customers.  Executive Functioning skills start to develop at around 7-8 months and peak between ages 3-5.  Can librarians help with this development as well?