Blogger Intellectual Freedom Committee

Drag Queens Have Rights, Too

Drag Queen Story Hour is a gift to the ongoing conversation about the limits of freedom of expression. If you aren’t familiar with Drag Queen Story Hour, you might be one of the very few people who hasn’t been talking about it. No worries, you can remedy that by heading over to their website. DQSH was created by Michelle Tea and RADAR Productions in San Francisco. They then partnered with the San Francisco Public Library and later the Brooklyn Public Library, and as the website says, it is “just what it sounds like, drag queens reading stories to children in libraries, schools, and bookstores.”[1] There are many aspects of Drag Queen Story Hour that can be praised and celebrated: the inclusion, encouraging children to be themselves, and best of all, fun! Since I am writing this blog as a member of the ALSC Intellectual Freedom Committee, I am going to focus…

Blogger Intellectual Freedom Committee

Information Literacy – Please Pass the Grain of Salt

Does anyone remember the Spaghetti Harvest? Or the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus? These were early (and wacky) examples of media hoaxes. They became staples of information literacy instruction for many educators, because they illustrated how convincing even the most bizarre information can seem when it’s presented as fact. Today these scams seem benign and quaint.

Blogger Intellectual Freedom Committee

Wish You Were Here…ALA Annual 2018

New Orleans in June: stifling heat outside, sweater weather inside, and another ALA Annual Conference successfully navigated in possibly the longest convention hall in the country.  For those who had to miss it this year, here are some of the highlights from an ALSC intellectual freedom angle:  No doubt you have heard that the ALSC Board voted unanimously to change the name of the Wilder Award to the “Children’s Literature Legacy Award”.  Unfortunately, there has been quite a bit of confusion and misinformation circulating about this decision.  It is well worth your time to read the entire ALSC Statement about its decision, and to follow up with the blogpost by Jamie LaRue, Director of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom, here.  The title of the award now aligns more closely with one of ALSC’s core values, inclusiveness, and should not be interpreted as an attempt to censor Wilder’s books.   Concerned about information literacy? At a panel discussion about…