ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the 2010 ALA Annual Conference – #8

We’re in the home stretch — less than a week and a half before thousands of librarians and library staff from all over descend on Our Nation’s Capital.  And just in time for everyone’s arrival, Washington’s Metro transit system will be implementing round one of its FY ’11 fare hikes.  Not unlike many libraries around the country, Metro has been struggling to keep its budget balanced amidst declining revenue.  Thus, to keep a long story short, fares on Metrorail and Metrobuses will be increasing on Sunday, June 27 (pending final approval from the Metro Board on June 24), right during the Annual Conference.  Metro’s Trip Planner has already incorporated the new fares, so check it out to determine the price of your trip. Here’s a quick rundown of the changes in Metrorail fares: Regular Fare (Weekdays before 9:30am & 3-7pm, after 2am on Weekends) $1.75 minimum, $4.60 maximum (before June 27)        …

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the 2010 ALA Annual Conference – #7

Less than 3 weeks to go, Conference fans! Attendees to the Annual Conference this year will have the good fortune of visiting Washington during the Smithsonian‘s annual Folklife Festival on the National Mall (June 24-28 & July 1-5).  Each year, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival spotlights some of the many cultures that make our country and our world so special.  This year’s festival celebrates the cultures of  Asian Pacific Americans and Mexico.  There will also be a tribute to Haiti as well as a special area dedicated to the Smithsonian itself – Smithsonian Inside Out, which serves as a kick-off to the Institution’s bold new vision for the future.  Enjoy each culture’s arts, crafts, music, food, and more! Be sure to visit our wiki page for more tips and information at  http://wikis.ala.org/alsc/index.php/ALSC_%40_ALA_2010_Annual_Conference_in_the_Nation%27s_Capital for much more on D.C. and the Annual Conference. – Chris    

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the 2010 ALA Annual Conference – #6

If you need a few quiet moments away from it all, we recommend taking time to visit and reflect at the Pentagon Memorial.                 Perhaps few events in our lifetimes have had as large an effect on us as the tragedies that struck our country on September 11, 2001.  In September 2008, the nation’s first permanent national memorial to those we lost that day was opened on the west side of the Pentagon (the same side that was severely damaged that fateful day).  Each of the 184 memorial units (benches and lighted pools of water) commemorates the lives of the 59 passengers and crew of Flight 77 and the 125 Pentagon personnel who were taken from us that day.  The memorials are arranged along a timeline from the youngest victim to the oldest and are in alignment with the path of airliner that crashed into the building.  Additionally, each of the…

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the 2010 ALA Annual Conference – #5

Hop On the Bus to Storyville! Take advantage of your stay in Washington, D.C., as part of the ALA conference, to see Baltimore County Public Library’s newest Storyville at the Woodlawn Branch.  Storyville is an interactive learning center for children birth to five with their parents and caregivers to promote school readiness.  A bus will leave the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library (901 G Street NW) on Friday, June 25 at noon and will return to the library at 4:00 pm the same day.  Reserve your space by emailing Cecily Pilzer, a member of the ALSC Local Arrangements Committee at cecilypilzer@earthlink.net.  To confirm the trip, thirty-five participants must send payment of $21.50 made out to the Baltimore County Public Library by June 11.  Send payment in the form of a check to Maralita Freeny, Chair, ALSC Local Arrangements Committee, MLK Jr. Memorial Library, 4th Floor, 901 G Street NW,…

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the ALA Annual Conference #4

Nearly 6 more weeks to go! Washington, D.C. was first laid out by Pierre Charles L’Enfant in 1791.  L’Enfant’s plan was never fully recognized after an argument broke out between him and Andrew Ellicott, who had been conducting the survey of the District’s boundaries along with Benjamin Banneker.  Ellicott’s revised version of L’Enfant’s plan is the basis for how Washington is presently laid out.  When traveling around town, it will be hard to get lost if you keep these few things in mind: 1) The Lettered Streets (A-W) run east/west (parallel to the Mall).  A Street is closest to the Mall with the letters following alphabetically as you work north or south of the Mall. a) B Street is now Constitution Avenue north of the Mall and Independence Avenue south of the Mall b) There is no J Street c) I Street is sometimes referred to as Eye Street to avoid confusion with…

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the Annual Conference #3

Well, just over 2 months to left to go and counting….. For many of the tourists who visit Washington, D.C., the “high point” of their time here is a trip to the top of the Washington Monument.  Did you know that there are two other places to get a great view of our nation’s capital (and avoid the crowds)?  The Old Post Office Pavilion — 12th Street & Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Near Federal Triangle Metro Station (Blue and Orange Lines) Built in 1899, the 315 ft. tower offers an observation deck at 270 feet, the third highest viewing point in D.C.  Enjoy the unparalleled views and check out the Bells of Congress, just below the observation deck.  Don’t forget to grab a snack or a souvenir at the shops and food court on the ground level.   Washington National Cathedral Massachusetts and Wisconsin Avenues, NW Construction was begun in 1907 and…

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the Annual Conference #2

If you’re planning an extended visit in the Washington DC area before or after the annual conference, consider a day trip to one of the near-by cities accessible from DC by car or public transportation.  During the week, commuter trains service both Frederick (MD) and Harper’s Ferry (WV)   and Fredericksburg (VA).   By car, these are a short drive away when commuters aren’t on the road.  These cities offer lots of charm, shopping, and tourist attractions. Baseball aficionados may want to visit Baltimore (MD), also reachable by commuter rail and Amtrak.  Baltimore was the birthplace of George Herman “Babe” Ruth.  During the Annual Conference, Oriole Park at Camden Yards will be the site of the “Battle of the Beltways,” part of the MLB interleague series between the Baltimore Orioles (AL) and the Washington Nationals (NL). Check out the ALSC Annual Conference Wiki for additional tips for theatre-lovers, shoppers, history buffs, and more.  The ALSC Local Arrangements Committee…

ALA Annual 2010

Discover D.C. – The Great Blogdown to the Annual Conference #1

The ALSC Local Arrangements Committee is ready and waiting to welcome you to our nation’s capital for this year’s ALA Annual Conference, June 24-29.  We’ll be periodically sharing tidbits of information about D.C. and the conference here on the ALSC Blog during the next 2 1/2 months as we blogdown to the Annual Conference. Getting Around D.C. – The Metro The key to getting around Washington is familiarizing yourself with our Metro Transit System.  Known to locals as simply the Metro (several of its lines run at or above ground level, so it’s not strictly a subway), the transit system’s rail portion has been in operation since April 1976.  If you find yourself traveling on the Red Line through Downtown D.C., you’ll be on the oldest part of the system.  With 106.3 miles of tracks and 86 stations in 2 states and the District of Columbia, Metro is the 2nd largest…