Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Bridging Technology and the Middle School Library

This past year, I had the opportunity to attend the annual NYSAIS Education and Information Technology Conference (NEIT) for New York Independent School Librarians and Technologists. During the conference, I realized that while there is some understanding of what connects librarians and technologists (it is one conference after all), I work in a unique learning environment that genuinely sees my position as a bridge between the two roles. With my “technologist” hat on at the conference, I connected with technology integrators and EdTech professionals who often feel frustrated by confusion around their job descriptions, a lack of awareness in schools on how best to utilize a tech integrator’s unique skill set, and requests from administration to start teaching skills beyond what we think of as technology integration. Substitute “technology integrator” for “school librarian” and these frustrations might start to sound familiar. Most surprisingly, I was often the only educator with…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Music and Story time Programs  

“Music baby.” by cross-eyed doll is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0. How do you incorporate music into your story time programs? Has this gotten more difficult as more music has gone in the direction of  streaming? This was a recent and interesting discussion on ALA Connect. In the past, we used CDs, but some of us moved on to streaming. This may be great for listening  – but problematic for story time programs. What works best—Spotify? YouTube? Apple Music? Amazon? Dropbox? CDs? To pay or not to pay?   We polled ALSC’s Childrens and Technology committee members to see how each of our systems tackle this issue. The solutions are varied and work for those of us who use them, but they may not work for all.   With CDs, availability is the issue as they are neither being produced nor purchased as much. If you still have CDs, one option is…

Uncategorized

Telling the Library Story on TikTok

Recently, I have found myself scrolling through endless amounts of TikTok videos when I need to be catching up on my own personal summer reading list. This could be due to the rising heat or the bustle of summer reading, but I can’t manage to relax with a good book. Thankfully, it’s utterly enjoyable to consume all things book with increasing #BookToks – which seem to be driving up book sales for the publishing industry, and holds lists in libraries. Can anyone else not keep Colleen Hoover books on the shelf now? It’s also been a thrill to see more library accounts popping up recently. Libraries are using the short form videos on social media and joining other institutions like museums, while getting more widespread recognition for their efforts. There was even a session during ALA, which was shared on the ALSC blog. While most of the content on TikTok…

Children & Technology

Hybrid Programming: Evaluating Takeaways from the Pandemic and Moving Library Services Into the Future

In May, the Children & Technology committee presented a We Are ALSC Chat (WAAC) on the topic of hybrid programming in libraries. Our committee was inspired to host this conversation because the evolving nature of library programming (primarily in public libraries) has been a recurring theme in our own committee meetings throughout this term. We were also excited to bring in other library professionals as guests who have expertise, and a variety of experiences on the subject. The conversation was robust, and just what we were hoping for! Below are a few takeaways. Defining “Hybrid Programming” To start this conversation, we wanted to name that the term “hybrid programming” itself does not have one definition. It might mean live streaming, providing at-home kits, offering post-attendance incentives, brainstorming activities that have both virtual and in-person opportunities, and more. The underlying key to success being hands-on engagement and interactivity regardless of the…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Encouraging Guilt-Free Screen Time

I’ve heard plenty of parents express guilt over letting their children watch videos or play games on their phones – “I know I shouldn’t, but it’s just so I can get the dishes done.” It doesn’t help that it seems like recommendations are changing constantly and parents don’t always know where to look for the most up-to-date information. The last two years have been even harder – video chats and schooling have moved online and our children are getting more screen time than ever.

Administrative and Management Skills

Digital Media Resources updated for 2022

Hello Friends! We have some exciting news to share. The ALSC Digital Media Resources page has been updated. This list, created and updated annually by the ALSC Children and Technology Committee, curates current digital and tech articles, blog posts, and websites impacting the youth services field. This year we’ve added some new categories–media mentorship and podcast advisory–and updated recommendations on the familiar topics of children’s eBooks and apps, early learning, and research. Each section’s resources are selected with focused attention on the interactions of children and technology. 

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Serving Students and Families: A Collaborative Literacy Model in Support of Student Achievement

Much of my work as a public librarian centered on collaborating with school districts in an effort to connect with literacy and technology initiatives. This work was rewarding when we were able to center the needs of students and families, but building capacity to improve student success could also prove elusive. When I joined ALSC’s Children and Technology Committee one of my aims was to lift up stories of collaboration and achievement, so when I had the privilege of hearing about the efforts of the library and technology services staff at Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) and how they utilized their infrastructure support systems with the Nashville Public Library (NPL) during the pandemic, I knew it was a story worth sharing.

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Virtual Field Trips for School-Age Children

As the pandemic continues and children are increasingly required to stay home for a week or more, many school and public libraries are sharing a fresh round of digital learning resources with their communities. If you are looking for new recommendations to send families and caregivers during this time, virtual field trips can be a particularly good fit for children to enjoy while they are stuck indoors.