Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Trending Tweenward

Anyone who has worked with me probably knows that I have a special place in my heart for Tweens. I love tween books and tween programs.  At my old branch, we had a Tween Area, and I have even graced a few of my Tweens’ Snapchats. What I also like about Tweens is that they are a bridge.  They are bridge to Children’s Librarians and Teen Librarians, to us and Teen Services- particularly if you are like me and serving as a Children’s and Teen Librarian!  In my experience when you say “I’m a Children’s Librarian” to someone, what comes to mind is younger kids. Tweens can sometimes be forgotten or overlooked, making me wonder if there will ever be a Tween Librarian position. I guess it was a no brainer that I attended YALSA’s 2017 YA Symposium in Louisville, Kentucky two weeks ago.  I sat in on sessions ranging…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

STEM Hurricane Irma Activities – Kids Tweens Teens

Weather map of hurricane

STEM Hurricane Activities So, yes, quite frankly we have been living under a rock for the past few weeks.  Why you may ask?  Hurricanes, of course!  It’s been a matter of survival!   Now that things are slowly returning to normal and libraries are re-opening, help kids understand one of the strongest forces of nature through STEM hurricane activities!     STEM Hurricane Activities just for Kids How does wind move across the United States – check out this amazing, interactive map!           Build your own hurricane without the messy cleanup!   In this interactive game, kids can build their own hurricane.  They’ll learn what kinds of wind conditions, latitude, and sea temperature make hurricanes.  It’s okay if they don’t know a lot about hurricanes—there are hints built in to help them out.       But wait, there’s more! Aim a Hurricane – Students can learn…

Blogger Pamela Groseclose

LARP on Mars: A Tween Program

  While sipping on my coffee and taking in the cooler weather, I can’t help but reflect on how quickly summer has gone by. Last Saturday was my library’s last day of our annual summer reading program. Its end brought joy and chocolate to my fellow staff members and groans and less excitement from the kids and families. As the upcoming school year brings new beginnings, I must reflect on how I served my tweens this summer. One of my favorite programs that I was a part of was a program entitled “Live Action Roleplay (LARP) on Mars”

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

STEM: Teaching Kids About Nuclear Concepts

Four days ago was the 72nd anniversary of a U.S. atomic bomb destroying five square miles of the city of Hiroshima.  Yesterday was the 72nd anniversary of the U.S’ atomic bombing of Nagasaki.  In five days time from the writing of this post, WWII ended. NEA The NEA has an excellent set of lesson plans, text resources, images and video to help children understand the events that concluded WWII. Turning the tragic loss of 210000 men, women and children into a positive experience for our youngest patrons is not beyond any of us.  And in many ways, I personally feel that the majority of those who perished that fateful week would want our next generation to understand the positive and constructive uses for nuclear energy. Voyager We are on the cusp of a major eclipse, and there’s no better time while children are excited about astronomy to tell them all about the…

Blogger Emily Bayci

Surviving School Age Storytime (and having fun with it)

School age storytime is one of my (million different) favorite parts of the job. I am a firm believer that stories should be read for people of all ages and particularly school aged children. They don’t get read to as much and can really be a fun audience that takes stories in a new perspective. Here are some of my tips for surviving school age storytime and having fun with it.

Blogger Pamela Groseclose

Books like Harry Potter for Tweens

As I have been celebrating Harry Potter’s 20th anniversary, I could not help but reflect on how Harry Potter has impacted my  life. About nineteen years ago, I remember looking for a new summer book to read. I would walk up and down the stacks of books for what felt like hours trying to find a book that I connected with. As I was roaming the stacks one day, my librarian noticed I was struggling and asked me to follow her up to the reference desk. Once there, she suggested a book that would forever change my life – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling. For the next ten years, I wore out countless copies of Harry Potter. I wanted to live and relive my time at Hogwarts. I finally had a series and a world that I connected to and I anxiously awaited its return. Nearly twenty years…