Partnerships

Summer at the Movies with the Library

Summer blockbusters, popcorn, and a reprieve from the hot weather. All things that conjure up pleasant memories of summer at the movies for many, I’m sure. What about adding library programming and awesome librarian superstars to the movie-going experience? This summer San Francisco Public Library (SFPL) has teamed up with a local movie theater, the Alamo Drafthouse at the New Mission, to partner on their Kids Camp. Kids Camp runs from May to August at the theater and is a way for kids and their families to affordably see films together with low ticket prices at just $1 – $5, with all proceeds going to local non-profits. On Wednesdays the films are free so SFPL staff has been facilitating pre-show crafts weekly in the lobby. Library staff also get to introduce the film and talk up Summer Stride and get some time in the spotlight! Did I mentioned that the…

Blogger Nicole Martin

Fingerprints and Forensics with First-graders

Did you know with a few simple, inexpensive materials and some creativity you can create your own forensics lab for early elementary kiddos? You can! I lead a STEAM focused program at my library for first, second and third graders entitled Imagination Lab. The idea is that for four weeks in the fall, and again in the winter, we meet up after school to explore a variety of concepts that fit under the broad umbrella of STEAM. We experiment, sometimes I demonstrate, and we always create something to take home. In the past few weeks we have explored the science behind sound, polymers, and color, but my favorite topic may just have been forensics! Inspired by the awesome Mad Scientists Club CSI program, I crafted my own 45-minute program for first through third grade patrons. I think this is a great program that can be easily modified for older children and held without breaking the…

Blogger Paige Bentley-Flannery

Caldecott Library Programs with Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear by Lindsay Mattick, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

Did you offer a Caldecott art program at your library?  As soon as the winner was announced, I started thinking about outreach art programs.  Yellow paper! Bears!  Zoo maps! Diamond shapes! So many possibilities. Whether you have five minutes or 45 minutes, below are a few ideas and resources to get you started. A pop-up school outreach Caldecott program with Finding Winnie. Place the book on display, create a huge bear picture on yellow poster paper or keep the yellow paper blank and have each child draw their own bear.  If you have 15-20 minutes, read Finding Winnie by Sophie Blackall and ask questions about the drawings.  For example: What kinds of materials did Sophie Blackall use in her illustrations? Imagination time!  What if you had a pet bear?  What would you name your bear?  Favorite food? What would you teach your bear?  Favorite game to play with your bear? …

Blogger Amy Koester

The Science of Slimy Things

A few months ago, one of my frequent program-goers made a request: Would I please be able to offer a program that includes slugs, one of his favorite animals? I was inclined to agree to the challenge, even before said child had his mother email me a photo of him with his three pet slugs. How’s a librarian to say “no” to that? I gave some thought to how I could meet the “slug” challenge while also closing out a season of many science-themed programs. I decided to return to a favorite concept with school-agers–slime–and explore it from two different perspectives: animal biology and physics. Thus “The Science of Slimy Things” was born. The program was divided roughly into two parts, the first considerably less messy than the second. We opened with an exploration of slugs–pictures, how they move, their scientific names, how they differ from snails, and the purpose…

Programming Ideas

Thinking Big in Children’s Programming

As my library prepares for our second Stuffed Animal Sleepover, I was prompted to think about library events on a grand scale. Two months ago my library participated in the Star Wars Reads Day festivities on October 6. The nationwide celebration was a huge success and we welcomed over 1500 patrons to the Children’s Library that Saturday. Many libraries and museums around the country use their spaces to hold special events from weddings to scavenger hunts. I’m aware that these examples are usually hosted by outside companies, but what if once a year the children’s department went all out for one major event? Taking inspiration from a few of my library’s heavy hitters, here are two possible big-ticket programs for your children’s department to consider. Traditionally our library has held an event each January called Nutmeg @ Night, for the Connecticut children’s book award. This celebration is an opportunity for…