Intellectual Freedom

The Answer to a Bad Book is a Good Book, or What to Do When You Receive a Complaint about a Bad Book

How do you tell a bad book from a good one? I’m sure you have some excellent ideas from your own selection techniques. You know how to select and recommend books for your readers and their individual tastes and interests. But that’s not what this post is about. It’s about what a constituent, citizen, taxpayer, parent, or child d thinks it’s a “bad” book, and it’s in your library and they want it out. What do you do when a book is challenged? There may be many of your readers who like this book, but the person in front of you with irritated look on his or her face think it’s bad, and you should do something about it. Bullet point 7 of “The Freedom to Read Statement,” states, “It is the responsibility of publishers and librarians to give full meaning to the freedom to read by providing books that…

Blogger Elizabeth Serrano

Banned Books Week from a Grad Student’s Perspective

Occasionally, the ALSC staff has the pleasure of working with interns early in their careers. Sometimes they are future librarians, and sometimes they aspire to enter a different but related field. That was the case of one of our recent intern, Sania Zaffar. She is a student at Loyola University in Chicago studying to become a Special Education elementary teacher. When Sania began working with ALSC, she was not familiar with Banned Books Week, so she spent some time with Kristin Pekoll, Assistant Director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) to learn all about it. One of the things that stood out during their conversation was that books targeted toward middle-age youth are more challenged or banned than those for younger children. Check out Sania’s article, Never Judge a [Children’s] Book by Its Cover to find out more about why. This does not mean picture books are never called into…

Blogger Laura Schulte-Cooper

Community Forum on Digital Literacy, Digital Citizenship for Children in Libraries

ALSC/AASL Collaborative Community Forum: Digital Literacy, Digital Citizenship for Children in Libraries

The ALSC Board of Directors and 2017 ALSC President Nina Lindsay will be co-hosting an ALSC/AASL Collaborative Community Forum live chat on the topic of Digital Literacy, Digital Citizenship for Children in Libraries. The forum will be held on Thursday, March 23, 2017 at: 1 pm Eastern 12 pm Central 11 am Mountain 10 am Pacific With library and education funding and policy in question, who is teaching children information literacy–where and how? From “fake news” to new privacy concerns, from government “data rescue” to the threat to intellectual freedom with loss of data and access to broadband, what on-the-ground strategies can library staff in public and school libraries employ to prepare children to be digitally literate citizens? This ALSC Community Forum will be jointly hosted by ALSC’s Intellectual Freedom Committee and American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Directors. We are delighted to open this forum to both divisions’ members. Helpful Resources…