Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Strong Dose of Back to School

Summer Reading is Over! So, pat yourself on the back!  It’s been a long road to hoe, but you’re just the Joe to hoe it.  It’s time to don the oven mitts and grab the red hot throat of back-to-school!  You’re going to need a strong dose of resources to help this season’s batch of students succeed this fall, winter – and beyond! National Library of Medicine No, I’m not going to ask you to visit the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for remedies for your upcoming stresses.  This month, we’re talking about their AMAZING resources for kids!  They’ve got something for every age group and every electronic device.  So let’s getting digging! Free Stuff! So, let’s start with the cool NLM swag.  Bet you never thought you’d hear that in the same sentence. Visit NLM’s Educational and Printed Materials section of their site to order posters, trifolds, bookmarks, and…

Blogger Pamela Groseclose

A Hogwarts Reading List : Ravenclaw

In honor of the United State’s twentieth-anniversary publishing of Harry Potter, I will be sharing a book list once a month to highlight books tweens should read based on their Harry Potter House. In April I highlighted books every Slytherin should read and in July I highlighted books every Gryffindor should read. This month I am highlighting books every Ravenclaw should read. Ravenclaws are often categorized as the smartest house, but this doesn’t mean that people in other houses are less intelligent. Like all houses, there are a diverse group of people that make up the house. Perhaps the most distinguishing quality of Ravenclaw is their love of learning. This often makes Ravenclaws possess intelligence, creativity, individuality, and wit. When it comes to reading, they often want to be challenged and learn something new. This results in Ravenclaws reading a wide range of literature. They especially love mystery or puzzle…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Serving Children in Crisis

Proactive Response In a recent NPR article, Vicky Smith of Kirkus Reviews pointed out that in the face of the global immigrant and refugee crisis, “It is a real desire on the part of authors, illustrators and publishers to respond to the crisis in a way that is proactive and helpful.”  In reality, the aim of youth services librarians is precisely the same. Our occupation combats and seeks to ameliorate illiteracy, and act as a social equalizer.  What is more, we seek to provide a proactive response to social issues in the only way we know how. If you find yourself confronted with the question of “why”, here’s your response, put best by Flying Eye Books (of Nobrow Press): “In the wake of the cruelties happening to immigrant children all over the globe, but most recently in the US with children coming across the Mexican border, many of us are shocked. The…

Blogger Pamela Groseclose

A Hogwarts Reading List : Gryffindor

In honor of the United State’s twentieth-anniversary publishing of Harry Potter, I will be sharing a book list once a month to highlight books tweens should read based on their Harry Potter House. In April, I highlighted books every Slytherin should read and this month I will be highlighting books every Gryffindor should read. Gryffindor Reading List Unlike Slytherin, Gryffindors have always had a great reputation. Harry, Hermione, and Ron are all in this house. Need I say more? Gryffindors are known to be courageous, honest, and brave. They are daring and tend to root for the underdog who bravely does what they need to do. People in this house tend to enjoy reading books with characters who have the same qualities and usually enjoy plot-driven page-turners that center around the hero’s tale or survival stories. They tend to gravitate toward books that are a series so they can watch…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Children in Crisis: Literacy brings Hope

Supporting Detained Children It’s little wonder that on ALSC’s listserv that the topic of supporting children caught up in a web of immigration policy came up.  Frankly, it’s in the youth services librarian’s DNA.  We do all we can every day for every child who walks through our library’s doors.  And for those we encounter in our outreach efforts, we do that much more.  It is not an unreasonable leap that librarians nationwide would want to get library materials and services to detained children. Why Literacy Behind Bars is so Important Before we delve into efforts by REFORMA and other non-profits and NGOs, the question that you need to be ready for is simply “why?” If children are being detained, whatever the circumstance, literacy is integral – key – to their chances for success. Here’s your top-5 why’s and ALL of these are about kids right here: 2/3 of students…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Libraries Rock: Between Summer READing ‘n’ Hard Places

Summer READing is upon us! So, you’ve got everything lined up for summer.  Performers – check!  Special storytimes – check!  Crafts – check!  Libraries rock! But what about the unexpected?  It’s all happened to us – a performer cancels at the last minute, or a crucial staff member calls in sick.  Will you be ready? Here’s some quick and easy hands-on activities that can be turned into full-blown, hour long programs!  All on the turn of a dime and just as affordable!  Rock – I mean – read on! Libraries Rock – Literally! Zen or Sharpie Stones What could be easier?  Take some rocks, get some Sharpies and create simply patterns all over them! These can be as simple or as complex as you want: Mini Rock Garden Easy mode: Get a shoe box lid, add some sand and rocks and create patterns with a plastic fork. Source: Pinterest Tip: Put…

Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Tales from a 6th grade Bookclub

Earlier this year I was lucky enough to obtain a through a private donor for a program with our local Catholic school- St. John’s. After meeting with the Head of School we decided to offer a bookclub to all Upper School students (6,7,8 graders) that would begin in January after winter vacation The club meets once a month on Fridays in the school after classes are done for the day.  Six students signed up and each month I lead them through a conversation and activity based on a book, that they get to keep thanks to the donor funds. My favorite activity was trying to draw portraits using our feet after reading Dusti Bowling’s Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus. Afterwards we looked at the works of different artists born without arms.  Other activities have included choreographing their own dance pieces and 90 second book summary videos. My favorite…