Blogger Renee Grassi

A Librarian’s Open Letter to Jacqueline Laurita

Hi Jacqueline, First off, I have a confession to make. I have never watched an episode of The Real Housewives of New Jersey, nor have I watched any of the Real Housewife series or spin offs.  It’s just not my cup of tea. In fact, there are probably many other librarians out there who share my opinion. And that’s perfectly okay because that’s not why I’m writing this open letter to you today. This is not the first time a children’s librarian used this blog before to broadcast their message to a celebrity. In 2012, I fangirled my adoration for Glee’s Chris Colfer for writing a book and encouraging children to read.  That same year, Susan Baeir penned an open letter to Kourtney Kardashian about how she admired Kourtney’s commitment to reading and literacy in raising her son. I’m not sure if you, Chris Colfer, and Kourtney Kardashian share many things in…

Blogger Lisa Nowlain

If humans were oviparous

I have been looking around at all the pregnant people at our library and thinking hard about what life would be like if we laid eggs. Would we need incubators at the library? Would we have storytimes for eggs? Babies might come out a lot more developed, so we’d have to change baby storytime. Hopefully there would be more gender equality. Honestly, this month’s post is a little wackadoo because your humble Youth Library is losing it over Summer Reading (and all the programs that happen before it). Lisa Nowlain is the Youth Librarian at Madelyn Helling Library in Nevada County, CA. She is also an artist type.

Blogger Angela Reynolds

Kid-Lit Tour of London

A serious whim recently turned into a 4-day trip to London, England. I had been drooling over the exhibit Harry Potter: A History of Magic at the British Library for some time. When my friend Kirsten suggested we go to London to see the Winnie the Pooh exhibit at the Victoria & Albert Museum, we began to plan in earnest. I bought tickets for the Harry Potter exhibit before I even got my flight booked. Tickets were selling fast and the exhibit did sell out, a first for the British Library. But I had two spots for the last day.

Blogger Alexa Newman

Working Through a Remodel : Library Life in a Construction Zone

  My library is in the midst of an expansion and remodel project. Phase one, the building addition, was completed last week. A two story, 8000 square foot extension is now open. For the Youth Services department, this means a new office, Creation Center, study rooms, Homework Center / Parent Teacher collection,  and expanded stacks.   It is super exciting having new spaces (including a new departmental office), but there have been a few hiccups along the way. There’s been a delay with our office furniture, so several of us don’t have desks at the moment. And most of our supplies are still in the mover’s totes. We were closed for two days last week in order to move shelving, including the entire picture book collection and play area. Some materials went to offsite storage, some are in temporary moving carts, and others are in totes waiting to be reshelved….

Outreach

What makes rural services to school-age children different?

I live and work in Nevada County, which is actually in California, to the great confusion of search engines and non-Californians (and many Californians). Our county has just under 100,000 people and 68% of people live in unincorporated areas, and 93.6% of the population is white (according to 2016 numbers from the US census). This county also skews older, with just 21% of the population under 18. Every rural county is incredibly different, so I cannot pretend to represent what working in a rural county is like everywhere, but here is my experience. I was born in San Francisco and lived there until I moved across the bridge to suburban Marin, worked in Oakland, and then in suburban Connecticut before landing here. Living in rural California has me understanding my own lens as urban. I expect excellent services that are easy to access. Patrons up here know that services exist,…

ALA Midwinter 2018

Namaste, Library Peeps : Getting My Zen On at #alamw2018

One of the coolest amenities at ALA Midwinter 2018 was the Yoga / Meditation Room. I hope many of you had a chance to stop in for a moment, or two, or …. just hang out and be present for a while.     For the past few conferences, ALA has been sponsoring the yoga / meditation room. Since I am moderately obsessed with yoga (although I’m not sure if that is a very “yogi” thing to say) I stopped by Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and got in some abbreviated practice. Even if you don’t have a yoga practice, being able to sit down and collect your thoughts and just BE for 10 minutes or so can be beneficial to both your mental and physical health. I found the room here in Denver to be an oasis of calm.  Dim lights, soothing music, mats and meditation cushions as well as…