Guest Blogger

The Human Connection: Public Libraries as Community Partners

Public librarians wear many hats.  From helping with school projects and feeding hungry children, to devising inventive ways to entertain families spending all day in our buildings, we must be ready at a moment’s notice to play social worker, housekeeper, and even parent. A tenet of our role as librarians is to embed ourselves in our community, as the library itself is a hub for collaboration and connection.   One way to accomplish this is through joining the board of directors of a local organization with a similar mission.  Having a representative from the public library at the table can provide a mutual awareness of services and programs to be marketed to those who need them. Some things to consider before pursuing board membership: Organizational vs. Individual member- Are you there as a representative or an independent member of the community? Passion for the mission- Be passionate about the organization’s vision…

Early Literacy

Stork Storytime Helps Libraries Help Families Deliver Literacy

Pregnant woman reading to her "bump"

When I was a new mom, I struggled to start and maintain a daily reading routine after bringing our first child home. I knew it was important to do, but adjusting to this new little person — and all the changes that came with him — made a daily routine more hope than reality. After I began my career in library land, I saw firsthand how critical developing a love of reading and becoming proficient in it was to a child’s future success, not only in school, but in life.

Guest Blogger

Keep the Kids from Fighting in the Back Seat or Podcasts for Kids

The ALA Annual Conference is full of inspiration, networking, and ideas. It is also overwhelming. It usually takes me a few weeks to process everything I’ve heard and learned. One session I’ve been thinking a lot about was “Kids Listen: Podcasts Amplify Engagement and Learning.” My library has had a podcast for several years. We are up to Episode 103! While not exclusively for kids, we occasionally have episodes with a kid audience in mind or that are about children’s materials or programs. We are fortunate to have a great audio engineer on staff, Benny, who makes us sound professional. At the beginning we had the lofty goal of producing a podcast every two weeks. Yeah, that didn’t happen. One of the main things I got out of the session was validation that podcasts take a lot of time to produce and I shouldn’t feel bad that we are not…

Guest Blogger

The Magic of “The Science of Breakable Things” by Tae Keller

As I comb through the books I’ve read in 2018, I keep returning to the Middle Grade novel “The Science of Breakable Things” by Tae Keller. It has been a good while since a children’s book has made such an impression on me.  In addition to being a clever and heartwarming story, it touches on themes rarely explored in Middle Grade fiction.  I think about how I would have reacted if I had read it as a child.  I imagine how validated and safe I would have felt.

Dia

Diversity in Children Services via Dia Programs!

I work at the South Huntington Public Library, in  South Huntington, Long Island,NY.  which serves a large Latinx population. Working in a community that is diverse is something that gives me joy, and it is important to me. Coming from a Latinx background going to the library as a child was not fun. I always had trouble finding books in Spanish where I could see myself, and I felt that I could not identify with the librarians at the time. Now, as an adult I love being able to work  with this community because I can see how comfortable people feel when they come to me for help. I always try to make the transaction fun and make jokes that will make them laugh. It’s nice to be able to build on that level of comfort to get feedback on what materials and programs they would like to see and…

Books

Read any wonderfully illustrated children’s books recently?

The 2019 Caldecott Award Selection Committee invites ALSC members to submit book titles for consideration. The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American picture book for children published in the United States in English during the preceding year. For the complete terms and criteria, refer to the ALSC website. Do note that only books from the 2018 publishing year are under consideration for the award. Also, please note that this suggestion form is for personal members of ALSC to use to nominate titles, and should not be used by publishers, authors, illustrators, or editors to suggest their own titles. Go to http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/2019-media-award-suggestions to post your suggestion. You will need to have your ALA login & password handy to access the suggestion forms. Deadline for your suggestions: December 15, 2018. Mary Fellows 2019 Caldecott Committee Chair

Books

Read any good nonfiction recently?

The 2019 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Committee is asking the ALSC membership to submit book titles for consideration.  The Sibert Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United States in English during the preceding year. For the complete terms and criteria, please refer to the ALSC website. Please remember: Only books from the 2018 publishing year are under consideration for the award. Also, please note that publishers, authors, illustrators, or editors may not suggest their own titles. Go to http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/2019-media-award-suggestions to post your suggestion. You will need to have your ALA login & password handy to access the suggestion forms. The submission deadline is October 15, 2018 for the Sibert Medal. Kathy Jarombek Chair, 2019 Robert F. Sibert Medal Committee