ALA Annual 2016, Early Literacy, Guest Blogger

Words, Words, Words: Increasing Young Children’s Exposure to Language Through the Words at Play Vocabulary Initiative

Books in barbershops. Parent ambassadors spreading the mission of vocabulary growth in their neighborhoods. Live animals, interactive musical performances, hands-on art programs and science experiments in libraries and community spaces. These are just a few aspects of the Words at Play Vocabulary Initiative.

Blogger Angela Reynolds, Collaboration, Early Literacy, Programming Ideas, Slice of Life

Painting with Primaries

Our local school is building a Natural Playground, and they are holding several fundraisers. I was recently asked to be part of a Really Good Idea for a fundraiser, which I think would make a fun library program! The idea, which was hatched and hosted by the owner of our local craft shop, was this: local artists would each lead a classroom in painting a large 2-foot square painting which would then be auctioned off. I was happy to find out that I was chosen to work with the Grade Primary class (here in Nova Scotia that translates to Kindergarten). I went with a big flower for them to paint. I had them in groups of 3 — the painting had seven areas to be painted, and I had each group work on a section. I might be biased, but I love our painting the most. I love the colours…

Early Literacy, Live Blogging, PLA 2016

Every Child Ready to Read and Its Impact on Parents in your Community @ #PLA2016

My job title is Early Literacy Specialist, and I’m pretty I would neither have that job title, nor would my job even exist (in it’s present form), without Every Child Ready to Read. I discovered ECRR shortly after it was introduced in 2004 and it was, in all honesty, career-changing. I was hooked on empowering parents through 5 simple practices (or, 6 skills in the first iteration) to help their children get ready to read and fascinated by the brain science behind it. Libraries around the country, including mine, began being more intentional in their storytimes about talking to parents about how the things they were doing were helping children develop vital pre-reading skills. ECRR changed the focus of storytime from the child to the parent. Has this change in focus been effective, though? Are we having an impact? It was, then, with great pleasure that today I attended Susan Neuman’s…

Blogger - Early Childhood Programs and Services committee, Child Advocacy, Committees, Early Literacy, Guest Blogger

National Library Legislative Day Matters!

National Library Legislative Day, a two-day advocacy event championing libraries and library legislation in Washington, D.C., is taking place from May 2-3 this year. The need to let our elected representatives know how imperative is it to have quality services for young children as well as decent pay for those of us who work with young children, has only grown within the past year. Two weeks ago, I watched a newly released video series called “The Raising of America.”  It presented updated facts and research regarding the importance of the earliest years in children’s lives as well as historical information regarding childcare in the US. I was surprised to learn that in 1970, Senator Walter Mondale introduced a bill called the Comprehensive Child Development Act (CCDA) that aimed to make the US government responsible for providing “high-quality childcare and early education, home visiting and other services to each and every family that…

Blogger Public Awareness Committee, Early Literacy, Outreach

13 Ways to Champion Literacy: Babies Need Words Every Day – The Blog Tour!

Well, friends, we here at the Public Awareness Committee hope that you’ve been learning A LOT by reading the daily entries in the Babies Need Words Every Day Blog Tour this week. As a refresher, you can find a link to all of the posts here from Early Childhood Programs & Services Committee chair Brooke Newberry. Our committee is tasked with wrapping up the blog tour by sharing some simple, high-impact ways in which you–yes, YOU!–can get these amazing resources created by the Early Childhood Programs & Services Committee out into your library and your community at large. Many of these are field-tested, so you know they’re legit. So challenge yourself to be an early literacy advocate in the next few weeks by doing one (or more!) of the following. 13 Ways to Champion Early Literacy using Babies Need Words Every Day Resources 1. Send the posters home with your storytime parents…

ALA Midwinter 2016, ALSC Board, Blogger Andrew Medlar, Early Literacy, Literary and Related Awards

Welcome to 2016 & See You at Midwinter!

Cheer, cheer, cheer the year, A new one’s just begun. Celebrate with all your friends, Let’s go have some fun! Clap, clap, clap your hands, A brand new year is here. Learning, laughing, singing, clapping, Through another year. –Anonymous (to the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat”) Happy New Year, everyone! Seeing out the old year, one of my final presidential activities of 2015 was also one of the most interesting. I was very happy to represent ALSC at the “Breakthroughs in Parent Engagement and Early Literacy” forum, presented by New America and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, sponsored by the Joyce Foundation, and held here in Chicago at Erikson Institute’s Technology in Early Childhood (TEC) Center. It was led by Lisa Guernsey and Michael Levine, authors of the book Tap, Click, Read: Growing Readers in a World of Screens, which Lisa talked about when she presented the keynote at…

Blogger Lisa Nowlain, Displays, Early Literacy, Programming Ideas

Keeping it simple

Sometimes it can be simple! I already did a comic this month, so here’s a recent easy project I created in our library: The Darien Alphabet! For a while now, I’ve been wanting to do a project that brings together early literacy, open-ended art activities, community-building, and library created book-making. I had a million complicated ideas and then one simple one. And simple ideas can work too! I put out an accordion folder with an alphabet on it, sheets of paper that said “A is for…” etc that had blank spaces on them for drawing, a map of the town, colored pencils, directions, and pictures from around town. We left the table up in the corner of the Children’s Library for a couple months, and then I scanned in the responses we got back and created Photoshop mosaics of the work. I got some great responses (and some really funny ones – R…