Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Book to Film: Wonder

Wonder was an instant hit when it was published in 2012. The book received starred reviews from Kirkus, Booklist, School Library Journal, and Publisher’s Weekly. On his blog 100 Scope Notes, Travis Jonker recently shared that his original review of the book is one of his top ten most read posts of all time. Only 18 months after it was published, Wonder hit one million books sold, an astronomical milestone for any book not named Harry Potter. We brought the book to area elementary schools on our annual booktalking visits in 2012 and since then have never had more than 1 copy checked in at any given time. It seems that each year, a new generation of kids discover the story of Auggie. With its enduring popularity (and having now reached over five million copies sold), it was inevitable that Hollywood would come knocking. In adapting the beloved novel, it seems Hollywood got it…

Blogger Laura Schulte-Cooper

Road Trip! Children’s Book Art in Libraries

Road Trip: Children's Book Art in Libraries

Happy Picture Book Month to all! When I recently received an email from Sarah Johnson (thanks, Sarah!) about Mo Willems’ Elephant and Piggie children’s library card at Forbes Library in Northampton, Mass., it got me thinking. I bet there are lots of instances of children’s book art adorning library spaces all over the country. One well-placed query on the ALSC-L electronic discussion list and my guess was confirmed! I  received some great examples of illustrators working with libraries, and children’s spaces decked out with fun, bright, inspiring illustrations straight out of the pages of beloved picture books and the imaginations of the artists. Join me on this virtual road trip to discover children’s book art in libraries. Bring on the Art! Check out these libraries and the wonderful gems they showcase! Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro, Vermont The Brooks Memorial Library exhibits original art from children’s picture books in their children’s book illustrator exhibition…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

¡Día De Los Muertos! ¡Celebramos!

¡Día De Los Muertos! Hoy celebramos Día De Los Muertos. Día De Los Muertos or Day of the Dead is not just on November 1st.  It is a three-day festival – October 31 – November 2 – that is celebrated throughout Latin America.  Here in the U.S., places that have large Latino populations, such as Los Angeles, California, and Phoenix, Arizona celebrate with incredible picturesque decorations like papel picado (estampo), costumbres, dulces y mucho mas. Día De Los Muertos is a huge fiesta – a national holiday – national, as in no school today, chicos! Remember, though, Día De Los Muertos is not Halloween.  Even though trick-or-treating has become more common on Día De Los Muertos, Halloween  is a Northern European tradition.  Instead, Day of the Dead is a blend of Aztec and Catholic beliefs. And yet, even ancient Egyptians once believed that “the spirits of the dead returned every autumn to…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

Hispanic Heritage Month Year-Round

Integrating Hispanic Heritage I’d been conducting storytime and other children’s programming for 18 years.  I felt like a veteran, or some kind of master.  In just one hour, my wife Marianne – who was born and raised in Puerto Rico – made me feel like I was only just beginning. For years I would start with a theme, pick out the books, make the puppet shows. And yet, how often did I reach for my Hispanic picture books?  Twice a year?  El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day, commonly known as Día) and Hispanic Heritage Month?  My wife showed me how to take a picture book or a story and build a theme from it – to reverse the storytime building process, and thereby integrate diverse materials into storytime – Every. Single Week. Hispanic/Latino Contributions So, I made a video.  It was all about the contributions…

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Discovering #Kidlit Film Adaptations

Where can you go to find out which of your beloved #kidlit books are being turned into movies? The answer is important to children’s Collectors everywhere, as we know that an upcoming movie adaptation can spark interest in a long-dormant book, resulting in an unexpected holds list! Here are a few of my favorite resources for finding book-to-film adaptations. Early Word Despite founder Nora Rawlinson’s announcement that her vitally useful blog Early Word was ceasing publication of new posts on July 3, 2017, I am pleased to report that thus far, the site seems to be updated with regularity, especially its Adaptations updates, which have been an essential tool in my purchasing for seven years. I have yet to find a better, more well-resourced source of all the upcoming literary adaptations, adult and children alike, than the offerings of Early Word. On the right-hand column on the site, readers will…

Blogger Renee Grassi

Recommending Books for Kids with Low Vision

Twitter is a great place to share ideas with your fellow youth librarians.  Just recently, Jennifer Taggart, blogger at Adaptive Umbrella and author of the recent ALSC blog post Inclusive Technology Station, reached out to her Twitter followers.  She needed suggestions of high contrast picture books for children with low vision to add to her library’s special needs collection. It made me think–how do families with children who have low vision find library books? Unless our libraries have a special needs collection, it can be difficult for librarians and parents alike to sift through all of the picture books to find the right one. If this is a situation you have struggled with at your library, here are some criteria you can consider when making book recommendations to families with children with low vision. High Contrast: Books featuring high contrasting colors are inherently more accessible to children with low vision.  These titles offer…

Blogger Jennifer Schultz

Doggone Good Reads: Books for National Dog Day

With summer reading over, the first day of school, and the eclipse behind us,  my coworker and I were puzzling over themes for our main displays. Since it’s still too early for Hispanic Heritage Month and the fall season, we eventually settled on books for Library Card Sign Up Month. However, we also have a smaller display near our desk, which we usually use to highlight readers, novels, and nonfiction for older readers. Luckily, I stumbled upon National Dog Day, and knew I had a winner! Dog books attract both reluctant readers and avid readers, so we definitely have something for everybody. If you want a fast-moving display, consider a National Dog Day (August 26) display:     Image: National Geographic  National Geographic Kids publishes a wide array of high-interest nonfiction for young readers; naturally, animals and nature are a big part of their catalog (they also have outstanding science…