Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Website Content Curation

One of the ALSC competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries is to create and maintain “…a physical and digital library environment that provides the best possible access to materials and resources for children of all cultures and abilities and their caregivers.” While providing a physical environment can appear a more stable though still challenging undertaking, maintaining a digital library environment is a constantly changing task, requiring ongoing assessment and modification.

Blogger Alexa Newman

Eclipse Madness : Zombies Might be Easier

In case you are one of the 18 people who  haven’t yet heard the news: there’s going to be a total solar eclipse on August 21st, that will cross the United States. Media coverage of this rare occurrence  is exploding. It’s exciting to have such an enthusiastic response from the public.  It’s also a little intimidating.     Along with 4799 other public libraries, my library was lucky enough to be selected for the eclipse viewing glasses grant. The 2017 Solar Eclipse project is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF5373 to the Space Science Institute.  When I applied months ago, barely anyone had heard about the event. It hardly made a ripple in the programming pond.  Some of my colleagues questioned why we would need so many pairs of the glasses. I strenuously asserted that, yes, we would need every single pair. It turns out…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

STEM: Teaching Kids About Nuclear Concepts

Four days ago was the 72nd anniversary of a U.S. atomic bomb destroying five square miles of the city of Hiroshima.  Yesterday was the 72nd anniversary of the U.S’ atomic bombing of Nagasaki.  In five days time from the writing of this post, WWII ended. NEA The NEA has an excellent set of lesson plans, text resources, images and video to help children understand the events that concluded WWII. Turning the tragic loss of 210000 men, women and children into a positive experience for our youngest patrons is not beyond any of us.  And in many ways, I personally feel that the majority of those who perished that fateful week would want our next generation to understand the positive and constructive uses for nuclear energy. Voyager We are on the cusp of a major eclipse, and there’s no better time while children are excited about astronomy to tell them all about the…

apps

Notable Children’s Digital Media Committee wants your Apps!

The 2018 inaugural Notable Children’s Digital Media Committee welcomes your suggestions of Apps for the initial January 2018 list. Per the ALSC Board, children’s digital media is defined as follows: Any real-time, dynamic, and interactive media content or product that is available via personal electronic device across multiple platforms that enables and encourages active engagement and social interaction while developmentally appropriately informing, educating, and/or entertaining. The Committee will select, annotate, and present for publication, a bi-annual list of notable children’s digital media, including websites and Apps of interest to young people and their families, from birth through age 14, starting in January 2018. Please note the following: Apps must currently be available through a US distributor. Apps will be evaluated based on the following criteria: 1.    Respect young people’s intelligence and imagination 2.    Exhibit venturesome creativity 3.    Reflect and encourage the natural interest of children and young adolescents in exemplary…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

A Meeting of the Minds at KidLib Camp

Next Thursday, August 3rd, Darien Library will host the ninth annual KidLib Camp. KidLib is a free unconference for youth services librarians, the brainchild of Gretchen Caserotti way back in 2009. The one day event, which lasts from 9-4 p.m., is a chance for professionals from public libraries and schools to get together and talk about the things that matter to them. The day is billed as an “un” conference because the topics for discussion are not predetermined. Participants suggest topics they’d like to talk about when they sign up to attend, and then in the morning before the day begins, everyone votes for their three favorites. The library provides coffee and lunch, and attendees provide the day’s discussions! Since 2012, we’ve kicked off KidLib with a brief keynote address, with educators from The Carle, Sesame Workshop, and past ALSC and ALA Presidents addressing the group at the start of…