Blogger Katie Salo

Helping Patrons Navigate Beginning Readers

As the librarian responsible for the beginning readers section at my library, I’ve been working on ways to help my patrons navigate beginning readers. And there was a ton of room for improvement! So…before I got started, this section looked like this: It’s a functioning section, of course. Patrons could reach the books and browse. But it wasn’t the experience that our picture book bins provided. Comparing the two sections (that are right next to each other), I could see that the readers were being left behind. I knew I needed a plan. Weed. The kind of deep weed where you not only check circulation and condition but also content. Is this book a good beginning reader? Has it been surpassed by a newer book? Tidy. Those half-haphazardly placed displays were not working and looked awful when empty. And the shelves were a nightmare! Nothing held up the books in…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

CSK Every Day – Peace, Non-Violent Social Change + Brotherhood

Coretta Scott King April 27, 1927 – January 30, 2006 Women, if the soul of the nation is to be saved, I believe that you must become its soul.  — Coretta Today, we celebrate one of the greatest civil rights leaders who ever lived.  While Coretta Scott King was the wife of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, her works, efforts, and message resonate powerfully through history.  Her works continued almost four decades beyond her husband’s death.  Think on what you can do to keep her legacy alive. As public librarians serving tomorrow’s leaders, it is essential that we bring Coretta’s message to our youngest library patrons.  Weave her message into the fabric of our programming.  Committing to the path of the children’s librarian is not an act that we can carry out once and for all, but an act that must be renewed every day. Peace, Non-Violent Social Change…

Awards & Scholarships

The 2019 Batchelder Committee wants your help!

The 2019 Mildred L. Batchelder Award Committee is asking the ALSC membership to submit book titles for consideration.  The Batchelder Award is a citation awarded to an American publisher for a children’s book considered to be the most outstanding translated book of the year. Books eligible for the award are those originally published in a foreign country and subsequently published in English in the United States. For the complete terms and criteria, please refer to the ALSC website. The 2019 Batchelder Committee calls on ALSC personal members to submit titles for consideration. Please remember: Only books from the 2018 publishing year are under consideration for the award. Also, please note that publishers, authors, illustrators, or editors may not nominate their own titles. Please go to http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/2019-media-award-suggestions to post your suggestion. You will need to have your ALA login & password handy to access the suggestion forms. The submission deadline is…

Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Tales from a 6th grade Bookclub

Earlier this year I was lucky enough to obtain a through a private donor for a program with our local Catholic school- St. John’s. After meeting with the Head of School we decided to offer a bookclub to all Upper School students (6,7,8 graders) that would begin in January after winter vacation The club meets once a month on Fridays in the school after classes are done for the day.  Six students signed up and each month I lead them through a conversation and activity based on a book, that they get to keep thanks to the donor funds. My favorite activity was trying to draw portraits using our feet after reading Dusti Bowling’s Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus. Afterwards we looked at the works of different artists born without arms.  Other activities have included choreographing their own dance pieces and 90 second book summary videos. My favorite…

Books

Let’s Talk About Diversity… with Isabel Roxas

For those of you who are regular ALSC blog readers, this post may seem a bit like déjà vu. After all, didn’t you just read something about diverse book recommendations last month? Well, you’re right – you did. Author/illustrator Melissa Iwai stopped by the 53rd Street Library in February to share some of her favorite diverse picture books, and I shared her list in my last post. But representation matters all the time, and so often children can’t find themselves on library shelves chock full of books featuring white, non-disabled children – and animals, of course. It’s important we know and have available books representing every child who might come into our library as well as the children they’re likely to meet. So earlier this week, illustrator Isabel Roxas came to 53rd Street Library for our April installment of Let’s Talk About Diversity. Born in Manila, Philippines, Isabel has illustrated…

Blogger Katie Salo

Five Quick Tips for Book Displays

For the past few months at the library, it’s all about the book displays! I’ve been working on our new centralized display area, as well as some other face-out displays on acrylic holders. It’s been wonderful getting to work on displays again and I love promoting our materials this way! And now…I give you my five quick tips for book displays: Keep your sign short and sweet. I love being creative and creating display pieces, but I have recently adopted the idea of “less is more”. Since I manage so much more at this library than I did in times past, I love taking advantage of signs that are already pre-made or tweaking signs to serve my purpose. My library uses LibraryAware and I love it, but there are other sources such as Canva. Diversify your displays. Make sure that you’re reflecting your community in your book displays. I make…

Blogger Jonathan Dolce

We’ve Got the Power! – Bridging Last Summer with This Summer

The Children Of Fear Are Not Alone Last year’s summer reading theme was Build a Better World.  Its message must not be lost. I have been actively involved in Central Florida public libraries since 1993, and it had to have been one of the most rewarding themes – ever. Recent events are showing us that children are growing up in an increasingly frightening world.  And they must not bear this alone. Last summer, my co-workers and I took our show on the road with a message of hope, and I’d like to share how you can couple Libraries Rock with real social impact. Before that, though, let’s review a couple of things.   Power and Truth In 1927, Max Ehrmann wrote the poem Desiderata in which he wrote: “Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.” And, yet…

Blogger Katie Salo

My Year with the 2018 Caldecott Committee

Hi, ALSC blog friends! I can’t believe it’s been almost a year and a half since I’ve “seen” you/written a post. I’ve been very busy this past year, working with the rest of the 2018 Caldecott committee, but I’m eager to be back here on the blog. So, let me tell you ALL the secrets of my year with the Caldecott committee. (No, not any discussion secrets. Those will remain in the Governors Square 15 ballroom in Denver.) I will tell you the secrets to what I think made an incredibly successful year and committee: Make friends with your mailpersons. I let my regular mailperson know that I would be receiving a lot of packages this year, for the Caldecott committee. Since they knew it was important, they left a plastic US Postal Service bin over the packages on rainy days to protect them. Post-it notes. I should have invested…