Blogger Stacy Dillon

So long…farewell…

…Auf Wiedersehen…adieu! It seems amazing to think that I have been blogging over here at the ALSC blog for 8 years now. But like all good things, it’s time for my regularly scheduled blogging here to come to an end.  It has been a wonderful experience that has led to great connections among other librarians and educators, as well as an opportunity to reflect on my own practice. I just wanted to take a moment to thank all of the folks who work on the back end as well as my fellow bloggers.  The ALSC blog is a fantastic resource that has truly grown over the years.  I know that I look forward to checking it everyday, and even more often during conference time. I’d also  like to encourage readers to take the opportunity to become  regular posters.  Reflections of everyday practice, sharing out of program successes and challenges, talking…

ALA Midwinter 2016

Taking Advantage of the Resources at #alamw16

I found myself circling the exhibits a few times while I was on the lookout for the ALA Joblist and Career Development Placement Center. Now, before you excitedly google my job, no I am not in the market, thank you very much. I love my library. So why the placement center? I wanted to take advantage of the amazing photography service. It’s been awhile since I have had an actual headshot taken, and let’s face it – sometimes that selfie just won’t cut it. So I found the placement center (it’s right near the post office on the exhibit floor), checked in at the desk, paid my $20 and headed over. There were 2 professional photographers there and we took several shots. The photos will all be sent to me digitally as raw files so that I can filter them up to my heart’s delight! This is a great opportunity,…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

Reading Resolutions

It’s that time of year when our thoughts turn to our “to-read” piles.  How do we decide what we are going to read in the coming days, weeks and months? In our field, we often come across many different kinds of reading challenges.  When we are reflective in our practice, we will notice to holes in our own reading lives, and many of us will feel like we need to do a better job to round out our genres/authors/styles. This year I have decided NOT to give myself a reading goal. This has less to do with the fact that I am entering into a committee year as much as it has to do with cutting myself some slack. There are so many books to read. I happen to be a member of goodreads and sitting in my “to read”queue are 379 titles. This is an unreachable number, and there will…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

Favorite Bits

Let’s face it…we all have favorites. Favorite authors, favorite bits of curriculum, (favorite patrons…shhh!).  I am at a favorite point of teaching with my second graders right now. We have been embarking on an American Tall Tale Study. I use Mary Pope Osborne’s American Tall Tales, as well as several stand alone picture books, including Osborne’s New York’s Bravest, and Isaacs’ Swamp Angel with the children.  We talk about geographical truths and wild exaggerations. We talk about humor and fear. We talk about who tells the stories and who is represented. At the end of our study, I ask the children to create their own tall tale character who would fit into the world of Paul Bunyan.  Fun, right? Turns out, in the past, it has been super hard for some students, and I figured out that I wasn’t being clear enough about world building.  7 and 8 year olds…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

PD Outside of the Library World

Over this past weekend, the Progressive Education Network (PEN) held their biannual conference in Brooklyn New York.  Our school was fortunate enough to be able to attend en masse when our Director decided to close school on Friday and send everyone. It was my first non-library conference, and I have to say that it clarified a few things for me.  One of the main take aways is that we need to build bridges and trumpet our skills further and more widely. A highlight of the conference for me (for obvious reasons) was the “Authors as Activists and the Importance of Diverse Book” panel featuring Jacqueline Woodson, Andrea Davis Pinkney and James Lecesne.  All of the authors had so much to say (see my twitter feed and the hashtag #NYPEN2015 ) but what struck me the most were many of the questions that the educators in the room were asking.  They were…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

Important Resource

I consider myself a bit of an old hand at blogging.  While I may not be as on it as some of my peers when it comes to frequency of posting and such, I have been at this since 2005.  I have seen many blogs come and go, and I have seen many trends come and go.  But for the first time in a while, I got excited about a blog because of its message and its timely nature. The blog I am excited for is Reading While White : Allies for Racial Diversity & Inclusion in Books for Children & Teens.  I have high hopes for the conversations this blog will be starting.  It is clear from initiatives like #weneeddiversebooks , and the #blacklivesmatter movement as well as the political climate, that discussions of race are on the forefront and are necessary.  The mission of Reading While White states in part- “We…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

Ideas with Crossover Possibilities

Sometimes, school life and library life overlap.  Sometimes they don’t. Often I read the posts of my public library friends and find myself nodding my head and then I read the posts of many school librarians and my experience doesn’t mesh with theirs.  There are two hot topics that are happening right now in both the arenas of education and libraries and we should definitely be expanding our thinking and reading outside of the library and the school publications proper. Makerspaces.  Unless you’ve been under a rock for the past 3-5 years, you’ve been reading about, learning about, or implementing some aspect of making whether you are in a school, a school library or a public library. I know that as children’s librarians we have been participating in maker culture for years, but the new focus really is more than a rebranding.  The blending of digital and analog, the open…

Blogger Stacy Dillon

Opening the Doors

I was lucky this week to host a fellow librarian from another NYC independent school.  She had attended a workshop at my school earlier in the year and wanted to chat about the job of the “American school librarian”.  She is to be returning to France soon, and is going to be writing a paper on the subject. We chatted about our respective schools for a bit and then got down to the real meat of the conversation.  What does it really mean to be a school librarian in the USA today? What are our roles? What could our roles be? Within this conversation, she filled me in on what it is like to be a school librarian in France. She lamented the fact that there are no elementary school positions — there are only middle and high school librarians in France.  I found this incredibly interesting, as my experience…