Blogger - School-Age Programs and Service Committee

FLP Book Bike

Over the past year, my role with the Free Library has changed a bit. I had a baby and moved from West Philadelphia to a different branch in South Philly to be closer to home and my son. I started working with a younger demographic and started thinking more comprehensively about library outreach. One of the benefits of moving to a different branch is serving fresh new set of patrons in a different environment and responding/adapting to the challenges that come with a new place. While working in West Philly, I always kicked the around the idea of a mobile library in my head, not in a bookmobile form, but something more low tech, with a minimal footprint that could be easily sustainable. One of my mentors at the Free Library described how he used to roll a book cart up and down Ridge Avenue to get those books into…

Blogger - School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Actual Fun for All Ages

In recent years, libraries have led the way modelling early literacy and learning behaviors for adults to share with the children in their lives.  But the intergenerational fun shouldn’t stop after preschool.  With programs that families can enjoy together, libraries encourage shared learning by school-age children, and their younger sibling, and their older siblings, and their grandparents, and their aunts and uncles, and their friends . . . .

Blogger - School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Summer Learning with your National Parks

We all love our national parks, right? But we may not always think about the U.S. National Park Service as a library partner given the indoor/outdoor aspect of libraries/parks. That was the case for San Francisco Public Library until an intern — who also was working for the Golden Gate National Parks — tipped us off about the National Park Service Centennial. Just goes to show that you never the source of your next inspiration! We’re now half-way through Summer Stride, San Francisco Public Library’s summer learning program, and we’re thrilled about the opportunities that this new partnership has lent to San Francisco families of children of all ages.

Blogger - School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Knitting Club for Tweens – a step-by-step how-to guide

Hand knitting has been around for arguably thousands of years, though in modern times its popularity has waxed and waned.  Waldorf schools around the world have long recognized that teaching young children handicrafts helps develop their fine motor and analytical skills. The great thing is, libraries can promote knitting, too! Currently, knitting is very popular and many libraries have started their own knitting circles. Here are several reasons to start a knitting circle for tweens at your library and a step-by-step list on how to get started: relaxation: knitting promotes a relaxing feeling similar to the effects of mediation; it hones general literacy skills, math literacy, and other academic skills; the whole process helps build self esteem, something that is extremely important for everyone but especially tweens; it’s fun way to spend time with friends; it may even help teach people to learn to code. Step 1 Start a knitting club for adults. My adult knitting group meets…

Blogger - School-Age Programs and Service Committee

Passive Programs for School Age Kids

Passive programs are a great way to engage kids, whether they’re hanging out after school, coming in on a school-free day, or are just looking for something to do! They often require minimal effort to prepare and get off the ground, but are then good for hours of fun and engagement. If you’re looking to add school age passive programs to your library’s offerings, want to freshen things up, or just try something new, take a look at some of these great options! Make copies of a book cover, laminate, cut into puzzle pieces, and set them out (above)! Put “postcards” out on a table and encourage kids to write a postcard to their favorite author or book character, like in The Show Me Librarian’s blog post. Bonus fun if you can find a place to display them in the library! Take a look at this collection of passive program ideas from Jbrary….