Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Discovering #Kidlit Film Adaptations

Where can you go to find out which of your beloved #kidlit books are being turned into movies? The answer is important to children’s Collectors everywhere, as we know that an upcoming movie adaptation can spark interest in a long-dormant book, resulting in an unexpected holds list! Here are a few of my favorite resources for finding book-to-film adaptations. Early Word Despite founder Nora Rawlinson’s announcement that her vitally useful blog Early Word was ceasing publication of new posts on July 3, 2017, I am pleased to report that thus far, the site seems to be updated with regularity, especially its Adaptations updates, which have been an essential tool in my purchasing for seven years. I have yet to find a better, more well-resourced source of all the upcoming literary adaptations, adult and children alike, than the offerings of Early Word. On the right-hand column on the site, readers will…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Book to Film: The Great Gilly Hopkins

A recent kidlit adaptation completely skipped past me until I discovered it streaming on Netflix a few weeks ago. The 2016 adaptation of Katherine Paterson’s book The Great Gilly Hopkins was released in theaters on October 7, 2016, where it had a limited run, and then released to streaming and DVD that same December. The Great Gilly Hopkins tells the story of Galadriel “Gilly” Hopkins, an 11-year-old foster child with a mean streak. When we first meet Gilly, she’s headed to a new foster home with a woman called Trotter, whom Gilly immediately detests because of her weight. In fact, she calls her a “fat hippo.” Gilly seems like the unlikeliest and most unlovable of protagonists for a children’s book. Katherine Paterson’s tremendous writing allows readers find commonality with Gilly’s hurt despite her prickly outsides. The book is considered a classic – it ranked 63 in a 2012 SLJ poll of the 100…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

A Meeting of the Minds at KidLib Camp

Next Thursday, August 3rd, Darien Library will host the ninth annual KidLib Camp. KidLib is a free unconference for youth services librarians, the brainchild of Gretchen Caserotti way back in 2009. The one day event, which lasts from 9-4 p.m., is a chance for professionals from public libraries and schools to get together and talk about the things that matter to them. The day is billed as an “un” conference because the topics for discussion are not predetermined. Participants suggest topics they’d like to talk about when they sign up to attend, and then in the morning before the day begins, everyone votes for their three favorites. The library provides coffee and lunch, and attendees provide the day’s discussions! Since 2012, we’ve kicked off KidLib with a brief keynote address, with educators from The Carle, Sesame Workshop, and past ALSC and ALA Presidents addressing the group at the start of…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Book to Film: Upcoming #Kidlit Adaptations

Film adaptations of children’s literature, or #kidlit, make up a healthy bulk of the current movies for young people. The well of published, beloved children’s books is deep and ever-plentiful, and it has been dipped into time and time again. In recent years, the trend seems to have accelerated. The success of the Harry Potter and Hunger Games franchises led Hollywood straight to kidlit’s doors. Librarians have been blessed with over a decade of high-quality movies based on high-circulating books, and there’s no sign of the rush of adaptations slowing down. In fact, in the next few months, new iterations of successful past adaptations are due to hit the screens. New Wimpy Kid Movie Next Friday, May 19th, sees the premier of the latest Wimpy Kid movie from Jeff Kinney. But Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Long Haul differs from its cinematic predecessors in that the entire main cast has been replaced. The original Greg…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Film Festivals At Your Library

We’re big, big film fans at my library. There is a tradition of watching movies at the library in our town, due almost entirely to an extremely successful adult program called Friday Night Films. Every Friday night, the library hosts two after-hours screenings of a recent film. Admission is free, and patrons can bring their own food or drink or buy popcorn at our cafe. Depending on the movie, there is anywhere from 100 to close to 400 people attending the films on any given Friday night. People in town expect that they will be able to see movies at the library, and this expectation carries over to the Children’s Department as well. In 2013 I took my love of book-to-film adaptations and together with my esteemed colleague Krishna Grady created RWD, or Read, Watch, Discuss, a book and movie bookgroup for kids. We have a RWD bookgroup three or four times…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Collecting for Makers

Depending on who you speak to, “Maker” culture is either a revolutionary new idea that has revitalized library services or a clever re-branding of programs libraries were already providing. Whatever your viewpoint, Maker culture continues to grow and thrive. We’ve had a Makerspace since 2013 in our library, but the past six months have seen an unprecedented uptick of patrons exploring the options in our TEA Room – Technology, Engineering, and the Arts. As a new generation of children discover the art supplies, circuit boards, and the 3D printer, we are examining anew our “maker” collection and its greater purpose in the library. When we originally opened our Makerspace, we wanted to have a collection of books that lived in the room and was specifically for its use. We purchased about 25 books – duct tape craft ideas, origami books, Raspberry Pi guides, and many more. But we quickly ran into…

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Book to Film: A Series of Unfortunate Events

Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events has been a mainstay on the shelves of children’s libraries since it first debuted in 1999. In its original review of The Bad Beginning, the first book in the 13-book series, Kirkus said, “Those who enjoy a little poison in their porridge will find it wicked good fun.” The nearly two decades since publication have proved that sentiment to be more than true. In fact, it seems each generation of young readers finds new fans caught up by the exhilarating, disastrous adventures of the Baudelaire siblings.

Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla

Film & Books: Disney’s Moana

Moana, the latest film from Disney Animations studios, is a hit by any measurement. So far, the film has grossed almost $284.5 million dollars in the U.S. alone, and currently has a 95% rating with critics on Rotten Tomatoes. The titular heroine of Moana is the daughter of a chief. She must journey across the ocean to find the demi-god Maui and rescue her people, an adventure that’s a nice change of pace from earlier princess movies.