Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Community Building with Technology

While the use of modern technology can still be contentious in libraries, by now many of us feel comfortable with or at least accept the existence of modern technology in libraries. One fear many of us still have is the problem of youngsters becoming isolated  users of devices. We encourage parent interaction, but we certainly can’t force it. We can, however, provide contexts that encourage not only parent interaction, but co-play among the children. On the floor play: Children’s librarians have long been champions of play and its merits. Most of us probably have some sort of play on the public floor of our children’s spaces, and we often see this resulting in unexpected play partners and friendships. We might hesitate to put screen or other technology in public places, for fear it will encourage solo play or detract from imaginative play. If you’re using screen technology, limit the apps…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Unplugged Picture Books

Technology at the library doesn’t have to be only apps, gadgets, and gizmos- it’s important to use your traditional book collection to support your technology literacy efforts too! Picture books can be a fun way to establish a print literacy connection in a tech program, or a great way to recommend families to extend ideas at home. I’m currently reading The Nature Fix: Why nature makes us happier, healthier, and more creative by Florence Williams and it has inspired me to think about picture book that might spark a conversation with children about the importance of spending time away from our technology. Some of these picture books may talk about robots, electronics, or computers, but they also focus on the value of unplugged time, a topic that media mentors know should be addressed in any discussion of technology and children. Check out some of my favorites below: Doug Unplugged by Dan Yaccarino Hello! Hello! by…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

2016 Trends: Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality

Each year, technology continues to change and evolve. In 2016, with only a few weeks left in the year, it is a good time to look back on two technology trends that impacted library services. This is especially timely since many of us will soon have to submit our annual reports to our library boards and with that, a look at the trends of the year.

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Teach Me Something Fun: Media Mentorship and Online Learning

“Libraries are about access, and we need to step up to provide ALL TYPES OF ACCESS.” –Amy Koester, ALSC Blog, Our Future Includes EBooks #alamw13, January 24, 2013 Online learning is a topic that deserves more focus.  Normally, in my conversations about electronic resources, the attention is mainly on ebooks or databases. Libraries, as informal and self directed centers of learning, have been concentrating more on online learning, and it is obvious we need to remember children in this movement as well. Yet when I did a quick and informal survey of library websites, I see much work and time has been spent by libraries on evaluating and recommending online learning sites, and some libraries have even created their own. Through media mentorship, we can draw both our young patrons and their caregivers to the many online learning products, free and paid for, that we subscribe to, find, evaluate, and…

Blogger Children and Technology Committee

Using Mobile Devices: Family Workshops

Why Mobile Devices? As schools move many services online, what happens to children who do not have a computer in the home? At a recent literacy training, I learned that 15 – 20 % of people are “smartphone dependent” – meaning that they do not have any other access to the internet (no home laptop or desktop computer). Often these children live in an area with no broadband service (so they rely on the phone company data plan) and their primary source for online information is a tablet, smartphone or other mobile device. You can find more information on this at www.pewinternet.org