Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Tales from a 6th grade Bookclub

Earlier this year I was lucky enough to obtain a through a private donor for a program with our local Catholic school- St. John’s. After meeting with the Head of School we decided to offer a bookclub to all Upper School students (6,7,8 graders) that would begin in January after winter vacation The club meets once a month on Fridays in the school after classes are done for the day.  Six students signed up and each month I lead them through a conversation and activity based on a book, that they get to keep thanks to the donor funds. My favorite activity was trying to draw portraits using our feet after reading Dusti Bowling’s Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus. Afterwards we looked at the works of different artists born without arms.  Other activities have included choreographing their own dance pieces and 90 second book summary videos. My favorite…

ALA Midwinter 2018

Tips for a Midwinter First Timer

ALA’s Midwinter Conference is almost here! (in case you couldn’t tell from all the other posts). Midwinter is actually one of my favorite conferences.  While Midwinter has been described as “not as glitzy as Annual” to me, a lot of important work goes on, and I don’t just mean the Youth Media Awards.    Committees meet, seminars like the Morris are held, and you get a chance to here from different ALA groups speak. 

Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Library Resolutions

Happy New Year! Over the years, I’ve started to give up on New Year’s Resolutions.  For me, they usually involve some form of overachieving or totally revamping something, and then when I eventually give up, I feel horrible. This year, I’ve decided to not have personal resolutions, but instead professional ones; resolutions that will help me be a better librarian and better serve my community. Below are my top 3.

Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

Trending Tweenward

Anyone who has worked with me probably knows that I have a special place in my heart for Tweens. I love tween books and tween programs.  At my old branch, we had a Tween Area, and I have even graced a few of my Tweens’ Snapchats. What I also like about Tweens is that they are a bridge.  They are bridge to Children’s Librarians and Teen Librarians, to us and Teen Services- particularly if you are like me and serving as a Children’s and Teen Librarian!  In my experience when you say “I’m a Children’s Librarian” to someone, what comes to mind is younger kids. Tweens can sometimes be forgotten or overlooked, making me wonder if there will ever be a Tween Librarian position. I guess it was a no brainer that I attended YALSA’s 2017 YA Symposium in Louisville, Kentucky two weeks ago.  I sat in on sessions ranging…

Blogger Alyson Feldman-Piltch

A New Classic

Yesterday, Jonda McNair posted about classic Coretta Scott King (CSK)  books on the CSK Blog.  McNair pointed out that often when one thinks of a classic book, they do not think of books written by and about African-Americans. Citing an article she wrote in The Reading Teacher in 2010, McNair shares what her criteria for a classic book in African-American literature are- often  books can be grouped into three categories: “universal experiences (e.g., death, love, and friendship) from an African American perspective, breakthrough books that are a “first” in some way or break new ground, and literary innovation (e.g., use of language, style, etc.).” At the end of the post, Jonda shares the titles of some CSK winners that meet this criteria, and are what she considers CSK Classics, one of which is a personal favorite, Everett Anderson’s Goodbye. As I sat on the train this morning to work, I thought about classics…