Tween Poetry Writing Camp

Today is the first day of National Poetry Month! Whether you’ve been sharing poems all year at story time, interactive poetry at schools or introducing new poetry books  to library customers, April is the perfect month to try something new! In January, I had a wonderful opportunity to observe a Tween Writing Camp, a new library program created by April Witteveen, Community Librarian at the Downtown Bend Branch at Deschutes Public Library.   The camp was one of the best Tween programs I’ve seen all year.   It was extremely well organized, filled with enthusiasm and so many creative stories.  Tweens were excited about writing – sharing their stories after each writing activity, working together on stories and talking about favorite books.   I knew right away I wanted to try a Tween Poetry Writing Camp at the Sisters Branch in April for National Poetry Month.  April shared her camp structure…

Poetry Month Wrap-Up Illustrated

I did a fair amount of live-blogging for PLA this month, so all my serious thoughts were all dried up – except to say that PLA is incredible and I learned a ton. So, to wrap-up Poetry Month, I wanted to share a display my coworker Krishna put together: We had slots for children to write their own pocket poems, and some of them are too good not to illustrate (no grammar or spelling altered). Poem #1: dope My interpretation: Poem #2: My Zootch Here’s what Shel Silverstein had to say about that: Poem #3: untitled My interpretation: To all budding poets, I salute you! All illustrations copyright Lisa Nowlain, 2016. Lisa Nowlain is the Harold W. McGraw Jr. Fellow and Children’s Librarian at Darien Library in Darien, CT. She is also an artist-type (see more at lisanowlain.com).

Poetry Timeline: Slither, Run, Crunch, Flap, Slurp, Aaaaa, Hooray!

Do you have poems swirling in your head?  Do you have one poem memorized that you share every day with someone new in the library?   Do you dress up during poetry month?  Have you created a poetree display? There are so many amazing fun things to do during poetry month!  This year, I switched up my school visits a bit and added a poetry timeline. The poetry timeline works great with 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders. Below are two options for adding poems to your timeline-Movement: Day 1 and Historical Events. Historical Events Poetry Timeline: Before your school visit, create your poetry timeline on a huge piece of colorful paper using makers or paint. Select a series of interactive poems that match up with a specific date. For example, Velcro by Maria Fleming invented in 1955. Start with a really really early date and end with 2016.  Add between 7-12 poems with a…

Poetry Paige’s Pocket

Do you share poems at your story time? Have you danced to a poem?  Pretended you were a fish writing a poem in the ocean? Or maybe you crunched and munched along with a noisy food poem?While yelling out words and acting out the poem, poetry at story time incorporates the Early Literacy Skills and encourages families to be silly together.  Add one or two poems to your story time theme each week. Poetry Pocket Song: (Tune: Old MacDonald Had a Farm) Here’s my poetry pocket with something inside. What could it be? I’ll open it up and take a look. Tell me what you see? (Possible felt items: A Pizza!  A Penguin!  A Ball! A Fish! A Kite!) How it works:  Sing the poetry pocket song, at the end of the song pull out a felt shape, have everyone yell out what it is, (It’s a kite!).  Then share the…