Blogger Jeanette Larson

Booklist Webinar on Tackling Tough Topics

It seems like almost every day  I see something on Facebook, a blog, or the ALSC listserv about a book that has been challenged. Or someone fields a question about how to handle a book about a topic that parents might prefer that their child not know about. As librarians we want young people to read the books they want to read, but sometimes we also are encouraging them to read a book they need to read.  Given our own personalities and beliefs, it can be daunting to hand a child a book on a topic we ourselves are not totally comfortable talking about. The next webinar in Booklist’s series will look at how we can find ways to talk to children and teens about tough issues. These might include anything from the Holocaust to contemporary racism. In addition to listening to several noted speakers share their views and expertise,…

Child Advocacy

ABCs of Inclusive Youth Programming

I’ve heard it said that if you meet one child with autism, you’ve met one child with autism.  Whether delays are in the areas of communication, social interaction, or behavior, each child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has their own individual set of strengths and challenges.  When a child with autism registers for a library program, look at it as an opportunity to create an inclusive program.  So where should you begin?  With your ABCs, of course! A — Adjust your mindset A child with autism may participate in Library programs differently than a child without autism.  For example, if you have a child with ASD, he or she may not feel comfortable with making eye contact with you.  They may also want to walk around the room, sit next to you, or touch the book that you are reading.  That does not mean, however, that the child is not…