Upcoming ALSC Online Education – April 2015

ALSC Online Education

ALSC Online Education (image courtesy of ALSC)

April is coming up and ALSC has a bundle of great learning opportunities. From online courses to webinars, ALSC has a learning choice that fits your budget!

Online Courses

Explore new ideas and great library thinking with ALSC online courses! ALSC is offering four great options including three CEU-certified courses. All courses are offered asynchronously (self-directed) meaning you won’t need to logon at a specific time. Learn new youth library-specific skills at a pace that’s comfortable and convenient. Courses start Monday, April 6, 2015.

Webinars

Because life in a library moves fast, ALSC webinars are the perfect solution for someone who wants and needs educational information but doesn’t have a lot of time or resources.  These short (one to two hour) interactive sessions taking place in Adobe Connect give librarians and library support staff the opportunity to learn right at their desks.

April

Be a Winner: Inspired Youth Grant Writing (Part I)
Thursday, April 2, 2015, 3 pm Eastern/2 pm Central

Be a Winner: Inspired Youth Grant Writing (Part II)
Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 12 pm Eastern/11 am Central

May

Celebrating with Poetry Snapshots
Thursday, May 7, 2015, 3 pm Eastern/2 pm Central

Archived Webinars

Missed a webinar you wanted to attend? Don’t worry! ALSC presents archived versions of webinars, which are offered at a discounted price. Archived webinars cost only $25. Please note that recorded versions are not available until all of the live sessions of that webinar have taken place.

Posted in ALSC Online Courses, Blogger Dan Bostrom, Professional Development, Webinars | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

San Francisco: Where To Eat and What to Do?

San Francisco's SoMa Neighborhood

San Francisco’s SoMa Neighborhood (photo courtesy of Rebecca Alcalá-Veraflor)

“Where should we go to eat?” In San Francisco, that question can have a myriad of answers. Never fear, whatever you decide will be delicious. Considered to be mecca for foodies everywhere, be prepared for your taste buds to dance in gastronomical delight!

Here are my top three reasons San Francisco offers the best culinary experience.

First, we have a diverse menu to choose from for your palette. From Japanese to Vegan to Brazilian and Pakistani, there isn’t much that’s missing. In addition to the diversity in food, we also like to offer yummy cuisine Off the Grid style or in a food court like the Hall SF.

Second, food is just a hop, skip, or even a jump away in many of our neighborhoods. The Mission District is the first that comes to mind when it comes to door to door food options. When people think of the Mission District the Mission Burrito usually comes to mind, and yes it’s good, but there’s also so much more!

San Francisco's Chinatown

San Francisco’s Chinatown (photo courtesy of Rebecca Alcalá-Veraflor)

Third, and my final point although I could go on and on, you will always find traditional and long standing establishments such as the House of Prime Rib, The Cliff House, and Farallon  among the new and innovative restaurants that pop up around the city.

The only downside to being in such a great place to find delicious food is deciding where to go. For your viewing and tasting pleasure, we’ve provided you with some of our favorite restaurants that are easily accessible by BART, MUNI, or within walking distance of the San Francisco Main Library, the Moscone Center, and the ALA hotels. Click here for some delicious dining options courtesy of the ALSC Local Arrangements team.

San Francisco's Mission District

San Francisco’s Mission District (photo courtesy of Rebecca Alcalá-Veraflor)

After a great meal, I love to walk around the city to do some shopping. Near the Powell Street BART station, you’ll encounter numerous shoppers walking up and down Powell Street as well as around Union Square. You can also spend a fair amount of time shopping in the Westfield San Francisco Centre which is also conveniently located at the Powell Street BART station.  Fairly close and within walking distance is Chinatown. Take a picture on Bush Street at the entrance and then have fun visiting all of the shops and eateries. Another tourist must see for shopping is Fisherman’s Wharf and Pier 39. You can find plenty of San Francisco themed gifts in both locations including one shop dedicated to Alcatraz. Don’t forget to take a picture with the famous sun bathing sea lions also known as the “Sea Lebrities while you walk around.

Welcome to San Francisco! Have fun and eat lots!

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Today’s blog post was written Rebecca Alcalá-Veraflor, the Early Literacy Coordinator at the San Francisco Public Library, for the ALSC Local Arrangements Committee.

Posted in ALA Annual 2015, Guest Blogger | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

First the Newbery, then the Cinema!

The Newbery Award, over its long history, has produced many enduring classics. But just how enduring are those classics when they are transferred from the page to the big screen? As my library plans our next season of R.W.D. (Read, Watch, Discuss) we took a look at some Newbery movies to see how they stack up to their literary predecessors.

2003's Holes

I think my favorite Newbery-award-winner-turned-big-screen-phenomenon is Louis Sachar’s Holesthough I will admit a bias: I am a huge fan of the book, and think it is one of best-plotted middle grades around. It helps tremendously that Sachar himself wrote the screenplay, an honor afforded to very few authors. Even J.K. Rowling didn’t get to adapt her own books! Any adjustments to the plot seem to flow organically and make sense. The cast is also excellent: Shia LaBeouf, whatever has become of him since, was magnetically watchable as the down-on-his-luck hero, and the always charming Dule Hill added extra pathos to Sam, making his demise even more tragic. If you’re looking for a great Newbery book-to-film adaptation, look no further.

terabithiaBridge to Terabithia is another classic Newbery-winner that was adapted into a well-regarded film, in this case, 2007’s version starring a young Josh Hutcherson (Peeta!). The trailer for this film made fans of the novel anxious when it was first released, as it seemed to over-emphasize to “magic” of Terabithia while containing almost none of the real-world issues that continue to resonate with readers today. It took me a long time to see the movie because of those fears, but when I finally did, I was pleasantly surprised by how faithful of an adaptation it was. The performances from the  young actors are great and the film manages to evoke the same emotions the book does.  When I was in school, we watched the 1985 TV Movie version, which has a decidedly more low-budget aesthetic but still holds up as a decent version of this beloved novel.

Then there are less successful adaptations. The Dark is Rising, which became The Seeker: The Dark is Rising in 2007, is notoriously terrible, with a 14% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and Time Out London noting that Susan Cooper’s fans “…are appalled by what they see as this dumbed-down version.” It stands as a good example of how not to adapt a beloved and award-winning fantasy series.

What are your favorite Newbery movies? Are there any you’d love to see on the big screen?

 

Posted in Blogger Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla, Children's Literature (all forms), Evaluation of Media, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Spring Cleaning: Storytime Style

Friends and colleagues, it is time to get organized! Spring is here — even though the nearly half a foot of snow Chicago just received might indicate otherwise — and summer is on the horizon. Now is the time to prepare for the chaos awaiting us come June.

So here are my tips and tricks for getting some simple office supplies and storage solutions working to keep us in tip-top shape.

Closet Storage Bins + Library Hanging Bags = Felt Flannelboard Solutions
and
Hanging File Folders + Sandwich Bags = Clip Art Flannelboard Solutions

Storage bins (left), hanging bags (upper right), hanging files (lower right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Storage bins (left), hanging bags (upper right), hanging files (lower right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

I store my flannelboards in two different ways. For the felt sets, I use six closet storage bins and library hanging bags to organize. Each bag contains all of my flannel pieces and a sheet of paper explaining the rhyme, story, song, or game to be used with the pieces. These are in alphabetical order and I allow all of my co-workers to borrow any set as long as they let me know. It takes up two shelves in my cube, but I feel it is well-used space since I have an estimated 150 flannelboards.

The second way I store flannelboards are for my clip art laminated flannelboards. I use a simpler system. I put all the pieces in a sandwich bag and write the name of the flannelboard on the outside of the bag. Afterwards, I toss them in these alphabetical hanging files. I don’t include the rhymes in these since most of these sets are my Letter Puzzles and different versions of the “If You Have…” song I use often.

Desktop Organizers + More Bins + Clipboards = Storytime Solutions

Desktop organizers (upper left), cloth bins (lower left), and clipboards (right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Desktop organizers (upper left), cloth bins (lower left), and clipboards (right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

I use a simple trick to get my books organized for storytime. Desktop organizers are absolutely perfect; the ones in this picture are typical called vertical file organizers. [A very similar one to mine looks like this example from Staples.] Each slot holds a week of storytime books, flannels, and CDs. I can grab a whole slot with ease on my way to step up!

The cloth bins are where all of my personal finger puppets (in the little ones) and hand puppets (in the bottom ones) go. I got both of these sets on clearance once college organizers hit the sales rack. The little ones I’ve had for quite a few years, but the tubs at the bottom are new for this year. All of these were fairly inexpensive since I waited for sales. I like using cloth bins because it doesn’t smash the puppets down like other storage solutions might.

Clipboards! At this point, you might have figured out that I never grew out of shopping for back-to-school supplies. But clipboards make my life so much easier! I keep a clipboard for each of my three weekly storytime programs. Before the sessions starts, I print out each week’s activities and attendance sheets. I put them all on the clipboard. I’m able to have this nearby in storytime in case I blank on an activity and can immediately circle the activities that we used that week. Keeping the papers on the clipboard allows me to write anywhere and also makes sure the papers don’t get crinkled in my storytime bag.

Plastic Bins + Old Kit Bags + Small Bins = Drawer Solutions
and
Managing the In-box Solutions

Inside of my drawer (left), the in-box solution (right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Inside of my drawer (left), the in-box solution (right). [Photo courtesy of the author.]

Manage the little minutia by hiding it in a drawer! In here you can see I try to compartmentalize my mess. All of my little office supplies (tape, post-its, expo markers, tacky glue) lives in a small cloth bin, with easy access. The plastic bin underneath the batteries, HDMI cord and cleaning cloths contains my felt supply at work in case I need to make a back-up felt piece. The green kit bag has all the extra charging cords and cables associated with our circulating LeapFrog kits. (That’s what the batteries and cleaning cloths are for as well — part of my job maintaining that collection means cleaning and battery checking once a kit comes back.)

Now for the paper in-box. Get three bins. The top is for weekly to-do items, the middle is for items to be filed, and the bottom is for on-going projects. Right now the top bin has a muffin tin to remind me to make felt cinnamon rolls. The middle bin has some strategic planning documents and ILS training sheets. The bottom bin it contains a replacement order I have to wait to order until after our ILS change in April, an audio order catalog to go through, and my clipboards that have programs that need to be written up from this week. The hardest thing to remember about the in-box is when your week ends, it should be empty except for on-going projects. I’ve used this system for years, including when I was a manager. It is GOLD for me.

I hope you feel confident and full of new ideas about tackling organization now! If you want specific product information, please email me [simplykatie(at)gmail(dot)com] and I will send you more information. If you want to trade tips and tricks, please feel free to do so in the comments! Do you have a favorite organization technique? Or a great idea to share? Let us know!

– Katie Salo
Early Literacy Librarian
Indian Prairie Public Library
http://storytimekatie.com

Posted in Blogger Katie Salo, Storytime, What I Wasn't Taught in Library School... | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Tali Balas: 2015 -16 ALSC Vice President/President Elect Candidate

In an effort to help ALSC members make an informed decision before they vote, the blog posts today consist of interviews with the candidates for 2015-16 ALSC Vice President/President-Elect: Tali Balas and Elizabeth “Betsy” Orsburn. Each candidate was given ten questions and submitted written answers.

This afternoon’s interview is with Tali Balas:

1.  What do you consider the most important role of the ALSC President?

Tali BalasI think the most important role of the ALSC President is to be a leader; and by that I mean she needs to be able to listen, build consensus, and make tough decisions. ALSC is an amazing organization filled with bright, caring professionals who come from a variety of backgrounds and who are in various stages of their careers. The President needs to be able to listen to the members and help build consensus so that the organization and the members continue to thrive. Sometimes this means making decisions that are not 100% agreed upon but we need to trust the process we have so that we can continue to grow and move forward.

2.  What skills & strengths would you bring to the office?

Passion, creativity, consistency, and organization. I have an enormous amount of energy and drive and would be honored to apply my skills to keeping ALSC vital in the 21st century. I am a process nerd and love figuring out how an organization works and how it could improve without losing its core values.

3.  What area of library service to children is your favorite?

I love it all! Outreach, programming, teaching, collection development, cataloging, finances. The beauty of being a school librarian is that I am able to do everything from processing books to putting on puppet shows. This variety is why I love being a children’s librarian!

4.  Why should someone choose to join ALSC? What services do you feel ALSC provides that are valuable to new members? To long-term members?

ALSC offers library professionals the opportunity to meet people from all over the country who have different experiences and points of view. This mix of people creates a dynamic space that allows for new ideas and relationships to form. ALSC provides its members with so many opportunities to develop professionally which is imperative whether you are early or late in your career. It is because of ALSC that I learned about the difference between endowments and long-term investments, how to create a strategic plan, and conduct a webinar. ALSC provides experiences that are not necessarily available at a local level.

5.  What are your ideas for reaching and involving members? What are your ideas to recruit new members?

The advantage of being a member of ALSC is the impact you can have at a national level and the relationships you can develop with people from around the country. We need our current members to speak with their local colleagues and find out what they need, bring that information back to ALSC, and find ways to meet those needs. Recruiting new members is something that all of our current members can do to help ALSC remain active and current. I would also like our current members to create a reel for youtube on the benefits of ALSC to help us reach even more potential members.

6.  How has ALSC membership impacted your life? How has your membership in ALSC impacted library service to children?

ALSC has completely shaped my professional life. My career and my program have been elevated in ways I would never have expected. At the beginning of my career I learned new programming skills, heard about innovative services others were offering and fell in love with first time authors. Later, ALSC provided me with opportunities to learn about organizations, management, and process in ways I wouldn’t have had in a one school environment. But, most importantly, it gave me the courage to try new things in my program that have had a huge impact on how my students experience the library. On a personal level, I have been introduced to amazing professionals who have become lifelong friends and supportive colleagues.

7.  Changes in the economy and advances in technology are dramatically impacting libraries. What are your thoughts on how ALSC can best continue to be a positive force for librarians, for libraries, and for children?

We need to encourage librarians to embrace the change and go boldly into the future. ALSC will continue to broadcast the importance of libraries and support librarians in their communities. We need to make sure that people understand the value that librarians bring in an age where everything is done by consensus. There is a major difference between a librarian’s expertise and the reviews on Amazon. ALSC needs to be at the forefront of advocating for librarians and libraries.

8.  ALSC has a commitment to conversations on diversity and inclusion and the essential roles that children’s librarians have in ensuring rich and diverse collections and programming. How will you work to enhance this commitment?

I want to continue to build on the momentum that is focused right now on ensuring that diversity, in all of its manifestations, is reflected in materials for children at all levels. Having the books themselves is not negotiable if we want to create diverse collections and programming. We also need to make sure that those books reach children, that librarians are buying the books for their collections and that they are getting on the shelves. I have always wanted to create a legion of librarians who makeover a library in need by processing, cataloging and shelving books leaving the librarian time and energy to create quality programming with a revamped space.

9.  What is your motivation in running for this position?

My desire is to make sure that ALSC is front and center in the national discussion when we talk about what services are imperative in a child’s life. I want to translate the passion I have for making sure that high quality library services are available to all children into tangible items that will help our members and the organization move forward.

10.  What else would you like the voting ALSC membership to know about you before they vote?

I believe that the gravitas of ALSC needs to be deepened through a marketing campaign that is followed by actions that are strong and clear. I have a vision that ALSC is well known in all types of learning and political institutions and can advocate effectively for funding for all communities. Libraries will once again be recognized as the cornerstone of a democratic society and our goal should be that everyone should have access to the myriad variety of services we provide.

Thank you, Tali!

Posted in ALSC Board, Blogger Mary R. Voors | Leave a comment

Elizabeth “Betsy” Orsburn: 2015-16 ALSC Vice President/President Elect Candidate

In an effort to help ALSC members make an informed decision before they vote, the blog posts today consist of interviews with the candidates for 2015-16 ALSC Vice President/President-Elect: Elizabeth “Betsy” Orsburn and Tali Balas. Each candidate was given ten questions and submitted written answers.

This morning’s interview is with Elizabeth “Betsy” Orsburn:

1. What do you consider the most important role of the ALSC President?

FullSizeRender

Photo by Christine Caputo

As president I would serve as the presiding officer for our organization’s governance. Yet I would consider my most important role to be the ALSC communicator-in-chief, keeping our association united around our goals and objectives and eager to face what the future brings. Our association is organized for the purpose of “creating a better future for children through libraries,” so that through free and equal access to library services, children can & will develop a love of reading and learning and become responsible citizens in our communities. It is through the united strength of our dedicated children’s librarians & educators that ALSC makes a difference both locally and nationally. Representing the ALSC membership within ALA and on the national stage would be another important aspect of the communicator’s role. To accomplish this, I pledge to listen to our members’ suggestions and concerns and encourage all means of two-way communication as a crucial part of my becoming the members’ true representative.

2.  What skills & strengths would you bring to the office?

Organization and communication are my top two professional strengths; and through years of management experience, I have honed them into skills. I believe both would be excellent assets for the office of ALSC president. In addition, I have the time, energy, experience and enthusiasm to accept the challenge of standing for election to Vice-President/President-Elect.

3.  What area of library service to children is your favorite?

Training/ Professional Development would have to be my favorite, and I was fortunate enough to serve as a Continuing Educator/Inservice Trainer for children’s librarians at the Free Library of Philadelphia and in the state of Pennsylvania. Although I spent most of my library career working on city-wide library programming for children, teens, families, caregivers and educators, participating on the 2014 Newbery Committee brought back to me the JOY of reading and evaluating children’s books. Several grant-funded programs allowed us to experiment & evaluate youth programming using the latest technologies. It’s hard to pick just one favorite area of library service from my many experiences; really the only task I didn’t enjoy was cataloging.

4.  Why should someone choose to join ALSC? What services do you feel ALSC provides that are valuable to new members? To long-term members?

Nowhere else can you find such a welcoming cooperative community of dedicated professionals united around our common goal of providing excellent library service & reading materials for children, than ALSC. Especially for new members, ALSC offers graduate scholarship money and travel scholarships to attend annual conference. Our association gives grants and fellowships to recognize our members, support outstanding programming, and aid in continuing education; there is also special funding to support library programming and collections. ALSC is a treasure-trove of educational opportunities with formal and informal mentoring, sharing in-person through programs, conferences, and institutes, virtually through online courses, ALSC blog, and Connect, and through CHILDREN AND LIBRARIES and other print materials. The opportunities to participate in ALSC process and award committees provide seasoned members with unparalleled professional and personal development; it’s better leadership training for librarians than any MBA program. As an ALA member with many years of experience under my belt, ALSC is still “my professional family” that provides education, comradery, supports and challenges that keep me actively involved. And I am proud that ALSC is a voice on the national level advocating for free, equal library services for all children.

5.  What are your ideas for reaching and involving members? What are your ideas to recruit new members?

Communication in all forms within ALSC is as important as our outreach for new members, and I pledge to keep this communication two-way and interactive. Because growing ALSC membership is such a critical priority for our association, I would commit to becoming an ex-offico member of the ALSC Membership Committee while serving as Vice-President/President-Elect. This hard-working standing committee has always executed excellent recruitment activities that promote the advantages of belonging to our association, as well as the many services and programs available to all members. I have enjoyed participating in ALSC 101 at past annual conferences, when I served on the ALSC Board, and I wholeheartedly support the ALSC Roadshow and continuing the funding for our ALSC volunteers to present, staff booths or coordinate social events at state and local conferences. Another support provided by ALSC through the Education Committee is the opportunity to be matched with an experienced librarian that has volunteered to share their knowledge and mentor newer members.

6.  How has ALSC membership impacted your life? How has your membership in ALSC impacted library service to children?

ALSC keeps me up-to-date and knowledgeable about the latest innovations and information in our profession. This organization has enriched my personal and professional life with friends, mentors, and educational programs, as well as numerous opportunities to develop my professional skills. I was privileged to present on conference program panels, to serve on the ALSC Board of Directors, and to serve on two Newbery Award Committees. All of which helped to build my knowledge, confidence and professional reputation.

My membership in ALSC has always made me a better and more informed children’s librarian and administrator of children’s library services and programming. The professional development materials including annual conference programs, institute sessions, and training materials such as Every Child Ready to Read, were and are so outstanding, I brought the information and sometimes even the official trainers to the Free Library of Philadelphia for our children’s librarians and other interested staff. And today I promote ALSC online materials and membership to my grad students at Drexel.

7.  Changes in the economy and advances in technology are dramatically impacting libraries. What are your thoughts on how ALSC can best continue to be a positive force for librarians, for libraries, and for children??

Challenges to the national economy have only re-enforced my commitment to ALSC and its strong national advocacy, which provides information and support for state and local resources for children in both public and school libraries. ALSC must continue this vital leadership role of advocacy for children and increased funding for libraries no matter what is happening in our nation’s economy. Another positive force from ALSC is the Everyday Advocacy project that empowers librarians to speak out. So whether on the local or national level, the association must ensure that it has a “place at the table” whenever decisions are made that affect children’s rights to libraries that are staffed with professional librarians.

Staying ahead of the curve with technology is essential for providing excellent library service to children, and ALSC serves as the fountainhead of knowledge in the field of library technology & its effects on children. By demonstrating, evaluating and educating our members on the best tech devices, systems, programs, applications, and materials currently available, our budget-starved libraries can wisely spend their limited funds on the best products & materials for children. Dealing with new media and technology is when I rely on our association’s newer members to help me & the other more experienced librarians to become more tech-savvy.

8.  ALSC has a commitment to conversations on diversity and inclusion and the essential roles that children’s librarians have in ensuring rich and diverse collections and programming. How will you work to enhance this commitment?

One of ALSC’s strong commitments to diversity can currently be seen in our joint support with Reforma for the DIA: Diversity in Action program. As ALSC President, I would certainly want to continue the exciting efforts that culminated at ALA Mid-Winter 2015 with the Day of Diversity and the Diversity Matters sessions. These conversations included finding practical strategies for increasing diversity awareness in the publishing and library worlds, ways to increase diversity in print and digital materials available for children, how to attract diverse children and families into libraries, and ways to build partnerships to create and share resources that support multicultural programming. From these rich conversations, our association will be able to formulate a plan of action and what our next steps will be. I believe that ALSC will institutionalize our commitment to diversity and inclusion, and if elected, I pledge to make this a priority. In addition, I have a strong commitment to support diversity among our membership.

9.  What is your motivation in running for this position?

I want to pay forward the numerous benefits that ALSC has provided for me. My membership in ALSC has enhanced my professional career and increased my enjoyment of children’s librarianship and literature so much. I look at standing for this election as my way of giving back to the organization that has given so much to me.

I wholly support the ALSC strategic plan and its blueprint for our organization, but we also need re-evaluate the plan and increase our commitments to diversity and emerging technologies. This is not a criticism of our strategic plan, which was formulated in 2010-11 when I was a Board member. Our strategic plan calls for a re-examination in 5 years (in 2017), and I would like to be part of this re-assessment.

10.  What else would you like the voting ALSC membership to know about you before they vote?

Here are three miscellaneous facts:

  • When not reading children’s books, I enjoy non-fiction, biographies and historical fiction. I guess the college history major in me still comes through.
  • I have come full circle since retiring from The Free Library of Philadelphia, by returning to my alma mater Drexel University to become an adjunct professor and teach Children’s Literature. Taking an earlier version of this same Children’s Literature course at Drexel was what convinced me to become a Children’s Librarian.
  • My orientation trainings as a new Children’s Librarian were led by Carolyn W. Field and Helen Mullen, both of whom served as ALSC presidents.

Thank you, Betsy!

Posted in ALSC Board, Blogger Mary R. Voors | Leave a comment

Building a great e-audio collection

The audiobooks in your library’s digital collection are easy to access from computers, tablets, iPods and smartphones. As you build and market the collection, keep in mind the different ways that children and families use audiobooks, and select titles to meet a variety of needs.

Preschool children may be drawn to the stories and characters of their favorite picture books. Think carefully about how the text will play without the pictures that help tell the story. You’ll also want to take checkout limits into consideration. Collections of multiple books, like Green Eggs and Ham and Other Servings of Dr. Seuss, and early chapter books like Hooray for Anna Hibiscus! may be more attractive to borrowers than a title which only lasts a few minutes.

Families listening together need titles that appeal to everyone. Stories like The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher include characters of multiple ages. Parents listening with older children will find a lot to talk about in nonfiction like The Port Chicago 50.

Children who have their own tablet or iPod can download and listen independently. For older elementary kids, having what they want the first time they look is crucial. Order at least once a week and pre-order when you can, so that your homepage shows the freshest new titles and you always have the latest books in their favorite series.

What are your secrets for building a great e-audio collection? Please share them in the comments.

Rachel

This month’s blog post by Rachel Wood, ALSC Digital Content Task Force

We would love to hear from you. Please email us at digitalcontenttaskforce@gmail.com and join our ALSC Digital Content Task force group on ALA Connect. Share ideas! Add to discussions!

Posted in Audio books, Blogger Digital Content Task Force, Collection Development, eReaders/eBooks | Leave a comment

Young Children, New Media & Libraries Infographic

Young Children, New Media & Libraries Survey

Young Children, New Media & Libraries Survey (image courtesy of ALSC)

Between August 1 and August 18, 2014, 415 children’s librarians responded to a survey of 9 questions concerning the use of new media with young children in libraries. The survey was created as a collaborative effort between Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), LittleeLit.com, and the iSchool at the University of Washington. Preliminary finding are available through an infographic created by ALSC’s Public Awareness Committee.

You can download a copy of this infographic from the ALSC Professional Tools site.

Posted in Blogger Dan Bostrom, Children & Technology, Professional Development, Projects & Research | Tagged , , | Leave a comment